5 phrases like Carlos Salinas de Gortari

5 phrases like Carlos Salinas de Gortari

Carlos Salinas de Gortari, who was president of Mexico between 1988 and 1994, launched during his six-year term and after that different phrases that went down in history.

Here some of them.

one. "I do not see them, nor do I hear them".

In his last government report, in 1994, Salinas used the phrase to refer to a protest by PRD members in the Chamber of Deputies.

two. "Do not become balls."

In reference to the rumors that the president (then also head of the PRI) 'played' the double candidate by having as official postulate Luis Donaldo Colosio, but another presidential candidate, Manuel Camacho Solis, without government office what opened the doors to be a substitute for Colosio if required.

3. "He complied, political fiction."

In an interview with Denise Maerker, when asked if he cared and why Andrés Manuel López Obrador won in the presidential elections of 2006, Carlos Salinas de Gortari answered that yes, he cared like any Mexican.

Later, when Maerker asks him if there was a truce between López Obrador and him, Salinas starts talking about the concept of "political fiction".

Four. "I have fewer friends than people say and more than I expected, I'm very lucky."

In the same interview with Maerker, she questions him about his return to public life in the electoral year (2006). Given this, Salinas says that "memory is short" and that it has appeared in different family events

5. "With a little luck, even from the sale of my book."

In a 2008 interview with journalist Jorge Ramos, when questioned about whether he is a millionaire and how he achieved it if he always held public office, the PRI said his money is legitimate and said that Ramos shared a stereotype as a result of a claim by the Mexicans

"I live on the income and the patrimony that I declared before the Secretariat of the General Comptroller of the Federation and also, with a bit of luck, until the sale of my book"

The book he referred to was The Lost Decade: 1995-2006. Neoliberalism and Populism in Mexico.

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