A ONE Energy Drink increases the risk of heart problems - in 90 minutes, experts warn

A ONE Energy Drink increases the risk of heart problems - in 90 minutes, experts warn

An energy drink is enough to cause heart problems, experts warn.

They found that happy drinks like Red Bull and Monster narrowed your blood vessels.

    Only a can of energy drink could be enough to cause heart problems, experts warn

Alamy

Only a can of energy drink could be enough to cause heart problems, experts warn

The narrowing of the arteries increases the risk of blockages that cause heart attacks and strokes.

The new findings reflect earlier studies in which young people were asked to distance themselves from the drinks.

Scientist under the direction of dr. John Higgins at the University of Texas, Houston said: "As energy drinks become more popular, it is important to study the effects of these drinks on those who drink them frequently." Is a safe consumption pattern. "

The team of dr. Higgins believes that the combination of the ingredients in the energy drink can potentially harm drinkers' blood vessels.

    Only 90 minutes after drinking energy drinks, tests showed that a person's blood vessels were constricting, increasing the risk of heart attack and stroke

Getty – contributor

Only 90 minutes after drinking energy drinks, tests showed that a person's blood vessels were constricting, increasing the risk of heart attack and stroke

They highlighted caffeine, taurine, sugar and other herbal ingredients and warned that they would damage the lining of the arteries and veins.

Energy drinks typically contain 80 mg of caffeine per 100 ml – about three cans of cola or one cup of instant coffee, according to the Food Standards Agency.

However, most of them also contain a lot of sugar and are often sold in 500 ml cans.

Experiments showed only one and a half hours after drinking an energy drink that a person's blood vessels had narrowed.

    Drinks like Monster and Red Bull contain very high levels of caffeine, taurine, and sugar - which, according to experts, could damage the lining of the blood vessels

Rex Features

Drinks like Monster and Red Bull contain very high levels of caffeine, taurine, and sugar – which, according to experts, could damage the lining of the blood vessels

Ultrasound measurements revealed that before the drink devoured, a person's vascular dilation had a diameter of 5.1%.

After that, it was only 2.8 percent, which "indicates an acute impairment of vascular function," warned the scientists.

All volunteers who participated in the study were 20 years old, were non-smokers, and had no previous health problems.

It is not the first time that energy drinks have been linked to health problems.

AS TELLS IF YOU HAVE A HEART ATTACK

A heart attack (or heart attack) occurs when one of the coronary arteries becomes blocked.

The heart muscle is then deprived of vital, oxygen-enriched blood that, if left untreated, can cause the heart muscle to die, but what are the symptoms?

Heart attack symptoms may be hard to detect because they can vary from person to person.

The most common signs are:

  • Chest pain, tightness, heaviness, pain or a burning sensation in the chest
  • Pain in the arms, neck, jaw, back or stomach
  • For some people, the pain and tension will be strong, for others it will just feel uncomfortable
  • sweat
  • dizziness
  • Become short of breath
  • Nausea or vomiting

Previous studies have linked her to heart disease, nerves and stomach problems.

Earlier this year, a Canadian study found that energy drinks in half of the children could cause nasty side effects such as heart problems and seizures.

This led to demands for a ban on the sale of drinks to teenagers and children.
Professor David Hammond said: "The number of health effects observed in our study suggests that more should be done to limit consumption in children and adolescents."

Activists in the UK have called on the government to ban the sale of energy drinks to children under the age of 16.

And many supermarkets and businesses have taken matters into their own hands.

In Janaury, Waitrose stepped up and banned the sale of drinks to under-16s after teachers said they would cut fuel in the classroom.

Asda, Aldi, Tesco, Morrisons, Co-Op and WH Smith have also introduced the ban on youth protection.

These new, early findings will be presented this week in Chicago at the Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association.

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