A Victorian street demolished in World War II was uncovered in Cornwall

A Victorian street demolished in World War II was uncovered in Cornwall

A Victorian street was rediscovered by unsuspecting construction workers after being demolished in World War II.

The developers in the Cornish town of Penzance discovered the hidden road known as Camberwell Street.

The site also houses a fireplace, oven doors, floor tiles, patterned linoleum and a host of other artifacts.

Ground plans of land can be seen for the first time since their demolition about 75 years ago.

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This old oven door, found in the remains of one of the houses, was discovered by archaeologists. The plaque on the front indicates that it was made locally

This old oven door, found in the remains of one of the houses, was discovered by archaeologists. The plaque on the front indicates that it was made locally

This old oven door, found in the remains of one of the houses, was discovered by archaeologists. The plaque on the front indicates that it was made locally

These iron railings were found on the site and may come from one of the front gardens. Stock images of the street show that most buildings had wooden fences

These iron railings were found on the site and may come from one of the front gardens. Stock images of the street show that most buildings had wooden fences

These iron railings were found on the site and may come from one of the front gardens. Stock images of the street show that most buildings had wooden fences

Work on the site has now come to a standstill as archaeologists sweep the area in search of more historical finds.

The site is currently being surveyed and eventually destroyed by incoming excavators, which will lay the foundation for 24 new homes – 17 for affordable rent and 7 for joint ownership.

About three meters (one meter) topsoil and asphalt covered the street, the curbs and the houses in front of the view.

A historical Environmental Impact Assessment was conducted by AC Archeology before the developers moved to the site.

It said, "The main archaeological potential of the area of ​​application concerns underground remains of the demolished terraced houses of Camberwell Street."

The team expected to find the road, but did not expect to find such well-preserved relics of the era.

Lino layers could be seen on the floor of one of the kitchen rooms of one of the houses. The team expected to find the road, but did not expect to find such well-preserved relics of the era

Lino layers could be seen on the floor of one of the kitchen rooms of one of the houses. The team expected to find the road, but did not expect to find such well-preserved relics of the era

Lino layers could be seen on the floor of one of the kitchen rooms of one of the houses. The team expected to find the road, but did not expect to find such well-preserved relics of the era

An old toothpaste tube discovered in one of the houses in the rubble. About three meters (one meter) topsoil and asphalt covered the street, the curbs and the houses in front of the view

An old toothpaste tube discovered in one of the houses in the rubble. About three meters (one meter) topsoil and asphalt covered the street, the curbs and the houses in front of the view

An old toothpaste tube discovered in one of the houses in the rubble. About three meters (one meter) topsoil and asphalt covered the street, the curbs and the houses in front of the view

Work on the site has now come to a standstill, while archaeologists search the area in search of historical artifacts

Work on the site has now come to a standstill, while archaeologists search the area in search of historical artifacts

Work on the site has now come to a standstill, while archaeologists search the area in search of historical artifacts

The street was listed as "Camborne Street" on the map of the area in 1941, but was known as Camberwell Street at the end of the decade

The street was listed as "Camborne Street" on the map of the area in 1941, but was known as Camberwell Street at the end of the decade

The street was listed as "Camborne Street" on the map of the area in 1941, but was known as Camberwell Street at the end of the decade

The street was listed as "Camborne Street" on the map of the area in 1941, but was known as Camberwell Street at the end of the decade.

Conditions in this region were inferior at the time. After the adoption of the Public Health Act in 1848, a newly appointed health inspector revealed that "ruinous or ill-constructed privileges and open septic tanks" exist.

Mr. George Clark published his findings the following year in a formal report, adding, "The overflow is exposed in gullies and trenches that line the homes and courts."

He went on to report that "the north and south sides of East Street, Camberwell, Adelaide and Penwith Street and others near them may be considered very poor."

Conditions in the region were inferior at the time. After the adoption of the Public Health Act in 1848, a newly appointed health inspector revealed that "ruinous or poorly constructed privileges and open septic tanks"

Conditions in the region were inferior at the time. After the adoption of the Public Health Act in 1848, a newly appointed health inspector revealed that "ruinous or poorly constructed privileges and open septic tanks"

Conditions in this region were inferior at the time. After the adoption of the Public Health Act in 1848, a newly appointed health inspector revealed that "ruinous or poorly constructed privileges and open septic tanks"

The street consisted of a narrow lane of 44 houses and had few modern sanitary facilities. She was soon convicted and ordered to quit

The street consisted of a narrow lane of 44 houses and had few modern sanitary facilities. She was soon convicted and ordered to quit

The street consisted of a narrow lane of 44 houses and had few modern sanitary facilities. She was soon convicted and ordered to quit

The modernization did not reach Camberwell Street, and its flattening began in 1939, before the war came, and forced the proceedings to cease. In the troubled times of World War II, the deserted street became a ghost town and was uninhabited

The modernization did not reach Camberwell Street, and its flattening began in 1939, before the war came, and forced the proceedings to cease. In the troubled times of World War II, the deserted street became a ghost town and was uninhabited

The modernization did not reach Camberwell Street, and its flattening began in 1939, before the war came, and forced the proceedings to cease. In the troubled times of World War II, the deserted street became a ghost town and was uninhabited

The street consisted of a narrow lane of 44 houses and had few modern sanitary facilities. She was soon convicted and ordered to quit.

The modernization did not reach Camberwell Street, and its flattening began in 1939, before the war came, and forced the proceedings to cease.

In the troubled times of World War II, the deserted street became a ghost town and was uninhabited.

In an archive of World War II memories collected by the BBC, a Penzance resident remembers the deserted road to blow up some American balloons

In an archive of World War II memories collected by the BBC, a Penzance resident remembers the deserted road to blow up some American balloons

In an archive of World War II memories collected by the BBC, a Penzance resident remembers the deserted road to blow up some American balloons

The modernization did not reach Camberwell Street, and its flattening began in 1939, before the war came, and forced the proceedings to an end

The modernization did not reach Camberwell Street, and its flattening began in 1939, before the war came, and forced the proceedings to an end

The modernization did not reach Camberwell Street, and its flattening began in 1939, before the war came, and forced the proceedings to an end

In an archive of World War II memories collected by the BBC, a Penzance resident remembers the deserted road to blow up some American balloons.

He said, "We arrived at Camberwell Street, which was between Adelaide Street and Mount St. Penzance Council. A few years earlier, the houses had been demolished, but had been stopped after the war, probably in the hope that the Germans would finish work for them, but of the 800 or so bombs that fell on Penzance, none of them fell on the Camberwell St.

"They had failed to turn off the gas in some houses and this was our goal to blow up the American balloons."

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