After school, London students offered protection from gangs in the local shops

After school, London students offered protection from gangs in the local shops

Students are being sheltered in the local shops after the school day in the gang violence-stricken areas of London.

A school in the capital has ordered Ubers for students who are considered the most vulnerable as school leaders try to tackle the flood of violent crime among youth, the Times reported.

It comes after five deadly stab wounds on the city's streets in just six days, including a 16-year-old in Tulse Hill, a 15-year-old in Bellingham, a 17-year-old in West Hampstead, and another 17-year-old. old outside the metro station Clapham South.

Her death has increased the total number of murders in London this year to 119. Many have involved students.

At Harris Boys Academy East Dulwich, students are encouraged to use "safe havens" on their way home if they feel vulnerable. These are local shops where a staff member has been trained by the police and closes the premises as needed.

The program was originally launched after the death of Lewisham student Jimmy Mizen, 16, in 2008.

A police officer regularly informs the school's staff about surrounding gangs and their areas of influence so that vulnerable students can be identified, according to The Times.

Sacrifice: Malcolm Mide-Madariola was killed in Clapham

Chris Everitt, headmaster, told the newspaper, "We have to tackle this head. We can not shy away from knowing that the students are at risk.

"If they come through the school gates, they can leave that behind, but they have to go out again. We want to give them the best possible chance not to get involved in gangs. "

Boys at school are often given workshops and lessons about the behavior of gangs to keep them from doing so.

Jai Sewell15, was stabbed 100 meters from his home in Bellingham

Mr. Everitt added, "Children are told how much money they can make through drug trafficking, hundreds of pounds per time, to buy the coaches they want.

"They do not understand the consequences of being committed, obsessed and exploited by the gangs. That's the way it is."

In West London, the headmaster of the Hurlingham Academy is known to cycle through the streets near the school to get around with loitering students.

At the Thomas Tallis School in Greenwich, there is a student diversion system where teachers patrol local businesses.

,

Leave a comment

Send a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.