ALEX BRUMMER: Rothschild to the rescue when he delivers the next chair of Barclays in Nigel Higgins

ALEX BRUMMER: Rothschild to the rescue when he delivers the next chair of Barclays in Nigel Higgins

City companies come and go, but Rothschild is forever. The Handelsbank has already given France its president with Emmanuel Macron, a protege of the youngest chairman, David de Rothschild.

Now there will be the next chair of Barclays at the experienced dealmaker Nigel Higgins.

The election of Higgins was intended to help Chief Executive Jes Staley as he fought to preserve Barclays as Europe's leading investment bank in the face of unwanted attentions from Sherborne's activist investor Ed Bramson.

Support: Nigel Higgins should be a support for Barclays boss Jes Staley (pictured)

Support: Nigel Higgins should be a support for Barclays boss Jes Staley (pictured)

Support: Nigel Higgins should support Barclays boss Jes Staley (pictured)

It is expected that the choice of a City Grandees will be slightly better than the last Chairman of the Square Mile, Marcus Agius, who has honored resigned after the Libor fixing scandal.

The fact that recent outgoing Chairman John McFarlane has stabilized the ship is unmissable, and extravagant promises to triple the stock price have never been realized. The Bank's progress has been challenged by its past, including the fines for subprime mortgages in the US and the shadow of the Middle East fund set up a decade ago.

The lawsuit was dropped against the bank, but former bosses like Patrician boss John Varley are still in court.

Staley's focus on strengthening the investment bank has been reinforced by a robust third quarter, demonstrating that the bank is still a strength in the debt markets it has had a long experience of. It also participated in some of the most well-known M & A transactions, including advising Sky during the bidding contest between Comcast and 21st Century Fox.

The Lehman heritage in the US means it has a much larger presence on Wall Street and beyond than its European counterparts, Deutsche Bank and Credit Suisse.

It would be a mistake if Barclays were withdrawn from this area and British and global customers were left with only the big American houses to choose from, as the city is aligned to the post-Brexit era.

Admittedly, Bramson delivered for his investors at Electra and F & C. There is no question that there is still a lot to do to sell Barclays shares at a discount of 30 per cent. Barclays has to be more than just another supply bank like Lloyds and RBS.

It is a pity that the supporters of Sherborne City, which include Aviva Investors, Columbia Threadneedle and Fidelity Worldwide Investors, continue to support Bramson, rather than a 300-year-old bank with a name that still carries weight worldwide. With Higgins in place, Sherborn's august crew of supporters Bramson should say he should hit his hook.

Culture vultures

Goldman Sachs is another investment bank that has conquered the world. Former Bank of England Governors include Mark Carney, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi, and US Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin.

Goldman's efforts to cleanse the culture after the financial crisis, first under Lloyd Blankfein and now under new dance-loving chairman David Solomon, have run into trouble. The US Attorney's decision to bring two former Goldman Sachs bankers and the Malaysian financier Low Taek Jho to justice is a reputational strike.

Goldman's former Asian partner, Tim Leissner, pleaded guilty to the money laundering plot and violation of foreign corruption practices and withheld $ 43.7 million. Colleague Roger Ng was arrested in Malaysia and extradition is sought. Asia Investment Banking co-chief Andrea Vella has been suspended.

Goldman raised $ 600 million in fees for his work on three bond deals for the Malaysian company 1MDB, which raised $ 6.5 billion in 2012 and 2013. Part of the money ended up in Van Gogh paintings, in Beverly Hills real estate and, fittingly, in The Wolf Of Wall Street. So far, the Malaysian scandal was largely under the radar because he was in a country where corruption is not unknown.

Now the Fed is involved, no one can be sure how bloody it can be.

Slow feeling

It was not a great week for the digital giants. Facebook disappointed investors with growth below octane. Google employees went on strike for alleged failure of sexual harassment.

And Apple fans are less satisfied with the rising prices for new devices. Closer to home Philip Hammond breaks with the EU a series of digital taxes.

The tech rally fluctuates and the stock market values ​​of the eight largest companies have fallen 21 percent or $ 900 billion since September. Yikes

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