Astronomers find the oldest star in the universe

Astronomers find the oldest star in the universe

Astronomers have discovered one of the oldest stars in the universe. They are 13.5 billion years back.

The scientists found the star based on the metal content, which is the lowest of all stars ever discovered.

The star body has only about 10 percent of the mass of the sun, which is why he remained undetected for so long despite the Milky Way.

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Astronomers have discovered one of the oldest stars in the universe and are 13.5 billion years old. They found the star by looking at its metal content, which is the lowest of all the stars ever discovered (picture).

Astronomers have discovered one of the oldest stars in the universe and are 13.5 billion years old. They found the star by looking at its metal content, which is the lowest of all the stars ever discovered (picture).

Astronomers have discovered one of the oldest stars in the universe and are 13.5 billion years old. They found the star by looking at its metal content, which is the lowest of all the stars ever discovered (picture).

The new star named 2MASS J18082002-5104378 B was formed very early in the life of the universe when there were no metals.

In general, the younger the star, the higher the metal content.

"We have never seen a star with so little mass and so few grams of metals," astrophysicist Andrew Casey of Monash University in Australia told ScienceAlert.

"This discovery tells us that the very first stars in the universe were not all massive stars that died long ago."

Experts believe that these little stars could theoretically survive trillions of years.

It also forces astronomers to rewrite the theory that old stars are all huge.

"These ancient stars could be formed from very small amounts of material, which means that some of these relics from the post-Big Bang era may still exist today.

"These stars are extremely rare – it's almost like finding a needle between one hectare of haystack," he said.

The star was found because he has a binary companion that astronomers were studying.

First-generation stars are objects formed in the early Universe (within a few hundred million years of the Big Bang) from gas clouds containing only hydrogen and helium.

The star is only about 10% of the mass of the sun, which is why it remained undetected for so long despite the Milky Way (picture).

The star is only about 10% of the mass of the sun, which is why it remained undetected for so long despite the Milky Way (picture).

The star is only about 10% of the mass of the Sun, which is why it remained undetected for so long, although it was in the Milky Way (picture).

They are the probable precursors for the formation of the structure and chemical enrichment of the universe. later, large star systems such as galaxies formed.

Dr. Casey believes the find could bring us closer to understanding how the first stars formed.

Their results will be published in the Astrophysical Journal.

Earlier this year astronomers discovered the moment when the lights were first turned on in the universe.

With a radio antenna not much larger than a refrigerator, the researchers discovered signals from the first stars that had formed before the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago.

The discovery provides the first evidence of the oldest ancestors in our cosmic pedigree, born only 180 million years after the beginning of the universe.

The breakthrough was described as "revolutionary" and "groundbreaking".

WHAT IS A STAR OF THE FIRST GENERATION?

First-generation stars are objects formed in the early Universe (within a few hundred million years of the Big Bang) from gas clouds containing only hydrogen and helium.

They are the probable precursors for the formation of the structure and chemical enrichment of the universe. later, large star systems such as galaxies formed.

Mathematical simulations have made significant progress in understanding the formation of the first stars.

Simulations suggest that in the early Universe a small fraction of very massive stars with more than one hundred times the mass of the Sun could have formed, even though the great majority of the first stars had formed with ten to a hundred times the mass of the Sun.

Their strong ultraviolet radiation and their energetic explosions probably had a significant impact on the evolution of stellar systems.

As these stars exploded, they left behind the heavy elements that would lead to the formation of the second generation of stars.

These in turn exploded, paving the way for the third generation of stars that includes our Sun.

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