Wednesday, April 24, 2019
Home Health Baby died after MRSA outbreak in Belfast Hospital

Baby died after MRSA outbreak in Belfast Hospital

One newborn baby dies and another, after catching MRSA, falls ill in the hospital's neonatal ward while the bosses examine the murderer's cases

  • The unidentified babies have picked up the mistake at the Royal Jubilee Maternity Hospital
  • The Belfast Health and Social Care Trust is now investigating the baby's death
  • The second baby, since his recovery, had the same MRSA strain

A newborn baby has died and another has contracted a MRSA outbreak in a hospital's neonatal ward.

The unidentified baby, who had died, caught the killer bug at the Royal Jubilee Maternity Hospital in Belfast.

Health officials are now investigating death. It is understood that the bacterium was not directly responsible – but was connected.

The second baby, who has since recovered from his ordeal, had the same MRSA strain.

The unidentified baby, who had died, caught the killer bugs at the Royal Jubilee Maternity Hospital in Belfast (pictured the hospital)

The unidentified baby, who had died, caught the killer bugs at the Royal Jubilee Maternity Hospital in Belfast (pictured the hospital)

The Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, which operates the hospital in question, is currently investigating the outbreak.

It states: "The Belfast Trust currently manages an outbreak of infection that occurred in the summer and included two babies who were in the neonatal unit.

"We want to assure the families of our patients and the general public that the situation is handled appropriately.

"The unit has robust precautionary measures for infection prevention and control and all precautions are taken.

"Visitors to the neonatal department can help prevent the spread of the infection by being conscientious about hand hygiene."

Death was reported as a serious incident and the medical examiner was notified, reports the BBC.

MRSA is a bacterium that causes infections. It is usually found on the skin and resists some antibiotic treatments.

In the vast majority of cases, it does not hurt, because the immune system is strong enough to fend off infections.

However, the bacterium is dangerous to anyone who is ill or having surgery – making hospital patients particularly vulnerable.

Hundreds die every year from MRSA, which can lead to life-threatening sepsis and pneumonia if left untreated.

MRSA has evolved to be resistant to many antibiotics, and figures show that in nearly two out of five cases, treatment fails.

WHAT IS MRSA?

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a type of bacteria that is resistant to several common antibiotics and is therefore particularly difficult to treat.

If the infection is detected early, it can prevent it from spreading and infecting others.

About 30 percent of people even carry Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in the nose, armpit, groin or buttocks without realizing it.

This can penetrate the body's bloodstream and release toxic toxins that kill up to one-fifth of infected patients.

MRSA is most commonly associated with hospitals.

The current screening methods are not only highly resistant to drugs, but also quite inaccurate, so that the infection can spread when a patient moves inside and outside of hospitals.

Even if the infection is successfully treated, the patient's average length of hospital stay will be doubled and health care costs will be increased.

The WHO has recently ranked MRSA as a high priority on its research and development list of new medicines.

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