Best memories: Rory Lawson won against South Africa in 2010

Best memories: Rory Lawson won against South Africa in 2010

It was the most powerful legacy. It carried love, support and encouragement and came in the form of a candy.

"A bag of Hawick Balls, to be exact," says Rory Lawson, whose pedigree would win him the first prize at the Rugby Crufts.

He followed his father Alan as a Scottish scrum-half from Scotland and has now taken the microphone of his grandfather Bill McLaren extraordinary acting in the hand.

Rory Lawson inspired Scotland in 2010 to beat world champion South Africa

Rory Lawson inspired Scotland in 2010 to beat world champion South Africa

Rory Lawson inspired Scotland in 2010 to beat world champion South Africa

"My dad gave me the passion and commitment to rugby, and that was Dad's gift," he says. It was also about the bag of sweets.

In November 2010, Lawson was appointed captain of the game against South Africa in Murrayfield. It was his first game after a hand injury. Scotland was also defeated by the All Blacks last weekend.

On my day off this week, I went to Hawick to visit Nana with my mother. Dad had died earlier this year and we went to his grave and had lunch. I just talked about him.

"On the way back to the house, I spontaneously bought a bag of Hawick balls. I had to hold the lecture of my first captain on Friday evening, and I was just finished. The dressing room included men like Chris Paterson and Nathan Hines.

So I took out the Hawick Balls and told the boy that my grandfather always had a bag with him when watching or training games. He said to one back: "Here, have one of them. It gives you an extra tempo ". Or he would say to a prop, "Take one, you need an extra two feet of speed."

"I wanted to say that in order to beat South Africa, we would have to be half a second and a half meters faster than they were in all areas. If we could do that, we could beat her. "The former World Champion was beaten 21-17 on a rain-drenched Murrayfield.

The sweets were an unlikely physical legacy, but Lawson's debt to his family is not just a professional crush but is also remembered.

"As children, we often went to Hawick, to Nana and Dad's house," Lawson says. "It's on the hill above Wilton Park, daddy had keys to the school at the time, packs, hockey sticks, balls, we went down there and threw skimmers into the river, then went to the shed over, throwing some rugby balls and hitting some tackle bags.

"Yes, we were born into a family where rugby was a big deal, but if we had chosen a different sport than Nana and Dad, Mom and Dad would have supported us as well. Their enthusiasm for the rugby game, however, has been transferred to us. Basically, they just wanted us to go out and play. Lawson then played for Heriots before becoming professional, traveling to Edinburgh and Gloucester and earning 31 capsules.

Lawson was named captain of the game, which became his first back after a hand injury

Lawson was named captain of the game, which became his first back after a hand injury

Lawson was named captain of the game, which became his first back after a hand injury

"He was very proud when I was selected for Scotland," adds Lawson of his grandfather. "Of his 51 years on the radio, only five or six years were in the professional era, and his key message was enjoyment.

"He gave me his full support, he believed in me, he wanted the best for me, he wanted me to love the game and not let it be a job between this and that joy, I lived on it.

"They have tough games, you play bad, but with everything you have to enjoy." His grandfather's legacy lives on in the Bill McLaren Foundation. It will be one of the beneficiaries of the best-in-the-house raffle organized by Tennent's camp. The prize is a seat next to Lawson for the autumn tests.

The competition rolls back time for Lawson, who as a child had his special place in the National Stadium.

"I have vivid memories of being with Goldenacre when I was a father when I was three or four, but Murrayfield also has a strong influence," he adds.

Dad had bonds in Murrayfield, section 17. I went there from about seven to eight years ago. We could turn around and look at him to give him a wave before the game. "No contact was made until after the game. McLaren had to work hard to be effortless. "I remember listening to him as a boy on TV, but as I grew up, I realized how much he was investing in," Lawson explains.

His preparation was legendary. In an era before Google or club websites, he would edit annual journals, visit clubs, talk to gamers and kit players. "McLaren would put together his" big hands "and" card games "containing information and stats on everything players and teams.

"What he did was an art form and one that he has developed in 50 years of broadcasting," says his grandson.

Lawson has incorporated this work ethic into his role as the lead voice in Premier Sports' coverage of the Pro14. His entry into the broadcast has evolved from studio punditry to pitch-side interviews to role as a match commentator.

He never asked his grandfather specifically about broadcasting recommendations because he did not think about the transition when the big man died in 2010. Therefore, I had a special passion and interest in broadcasting in general. "There were also messages from outside the tomb. "It was heartwarming to talk to some of the guys at the top of the game when it came to the comments, and when I asked them for advice, they told everyone – one man – that they had gone to dad and asked the same thing.

"So they passed that on. So I had a little bit of him that he gave me through other tips, "he says.

Lawson has incorporated this work ethic into his role in the reporting of Premier Sports' Pro14

Lawson has incorporated this work ethic into his role in the reporting of Premier Sports' Pro14

Lawson has incorporated this work ethic into his role in Pro Sports' coverage of the Pro14

He recorded the microphone like his grandfather Bill McLaren with extraordinary effect

He recorded the microphone like his grandfather Bill McLaren with extraordinary effect

He recorded the microphone like his grandfather Bill McLaren with extraordinary effect

The lesson "preparation is king" has been fully understood, but Lawson makes an important point in terms of rugby, most obviously the modern variety in which there can be a wave of phases. He was told by Nick Mullins, the commentator, that rugby could be a repetitive sport. "You have to find a variety of ways to basically describe the same thing," he adds.

This does not mean to slander the sport he loves, but to accept that bruising does not have to be described accurately, but rather that relevant information has to be added.

He loved to play, he now indulges in comments. "It's not all for me yet, but I like to learn," he says, knowing that at 37, a career can extend before him.

After all, his grandfather was 78 when he laid down the microphone.

Comment is just one of the jobs he now has. He helps with the Bill McLaren Foundation, which supports grassroots rugby throughout Scotland, plays a role in the SRU that accompanies Scottish-qualified players in the South – and runs his own business.

He has branched out into the health and nutrition market with a water-rich coconut protein.

"I've been doing it for three or four years now," he says, adding a chuckle. "Coconut water is the way forward." In it he could, if nothing else, find a disagreement with his dad. After all, there was never anything that rivaled a Hawick ball.

Tennent's camp raffles Rory Lawson's Best Seat in the House tickets for pitchside seats at the fall trials. The proceeds will be shared between The BEN and The Bill McLaren Foundation. Raffle tickets can be purchased now through Friday, November 9, for £ 5 through www.thebestseat.co.uk

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