The diversity of the species living on the planet has NOT increased since the death of dinosaurs, as a study of 30,000 places worldwide shows

  • Scientists believed that biodiversity had increased over millions of years
  • New research says that the number of species has increased in sporadic outbreaks
  • The biodiversity in the ecosystems does not have now & # 39; tens of thousands of years & # 39; increased
  • The results could shed light on the impact of today's globally decreasing biodiversity rate

The diversity of species living on the planet has remained the same for 60 million years after the extinction of the dinosaurs, as new research shows.

In the fossil record, a rapid increase in biodiversity was discovered, followed by stability plateaus of species numbers that lasted tens of millions of years.

Experts previously believed that biodiversity had been steadily increasing over time, but researchers say this is not the case.

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The diversity of species living on the planet has remained the same for 60 million years after the extinction of the dinosaurs, as new research shows. The impression of this artist shows top biodiversity values ​​(from left to right) 300, 110 and 15 million years ago. This rapid increase in biodiversity was followed by plateaus of the stability of species numbers that lasted tens of millions of years

The diversity of species living on the planet has remained the same for 60 million years after the extinction of the dinosaurs, as new research shows. The impression of this artist shows top biodiversity values ​​(from left to right) 300, 110 and 15 million years ago. This rapid increase in biodiversity was followed by plateaus of the stability of species numbers that lasted tens of millions of years

Researchers at the University of Birmingham analyzed 200 years of finds from 30,000 fossil sites around the world.

They found that the average number of land vertebrate species around the world has not increased for decades.

Their findings suggest that the creation of new species and the extinction of rats on land find a natural balance that is "dozens of millions of years". ongoing.

The lead author of the study, dr. Roger Close said: "Scientists often believe that biodiversity has increased unchecked over millions of years and that diversity today is much greater than in the distant past.

"Our research shows that the number of species in terrestrial communities is limited over long periods of time, which contradicts the results of many experiments in modern ecological communities. Now we have to understand why.

"Contrary to what you might expect, the largest increase in diversity within the terrestrial vertebrate communities came after the mass extinction that eradicated the dinosaurs 66 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous.

"Within a few million years, local diversity has risen to two- to three-fold, mainly due to the spectacular success of modern mammals."

The rich biodiversity has remained the same after the extinction of dinosaurs in the last 60 million years, as new research shows. According to a new study, the number of species in ecological communities on land has increased only sporadically over time (Figure).

The rich biodiversity has remained the same after the extinction of dinosaurs in the last 60 million years, as new research shows. According to a new study, the number of species in ecological communities on land has increased only sporadically over time (Figure).

Biodiversity describes the rich diversity of life on Earth, from individual species to entire ecosystems.

The term was coined in 1985 – a decline in "biodiversity" – but the foreseeable vast global biodiversity loss is a crisis that exceeds and possibly exceeds climate change.

In the most recent study, the experts focused on data from terrestrial animals, which originated almost 400 million years ago, before the very first appearance of this group.

They found biodiversity 300, 110 and 15 million years ago, followed by stability plateaus in species numbers that lasted tens of millions of years.

The new findings shed light on our understanding of the impact of declining biodiversity around the world.

The results also suggest that interactions between species, including competition for food and space, limit the total number of species that can co-exist.

The full results of the study were published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

WHY WAS THE DINOSAURS EXTINCT?

Dinosaurs ruled and ruled the earth about 66 million years ago, before they suddenly died out.

The Cretaceous Tertiary Extinction event is the name of this mass extinction.

It was believed for many years that the changing climate was destroying the food chain of the giant reptiles.

In the 1980s, paleontologists discovered an iridium layer.

This is an element that is rare on Earth, but occurs in large quantities in space.

When this was dated, it coincided exactly with the time when the dinosaurs disappeared from the fossil record.

A decade later, scientists discovered the massive Chicxulub crater at the tip of the Mexican Yucatán Peninsula, dating to the period in question.

The scientific consensus now says that these two factors are interconnected and both were probably caused by a huge asteroid that crashed to earth.

With the projected size and impact speed, the collision would have caused a tremendous shockwave and probably triggered seismic activity.

The fallout would have produced clouds of ash that were likely to cover the entire planet and make it impossible for the dinosaurs to survive.

Other animals and plant species had a shorter intergenerational period, allowing them to survive.

There are several other theories about what caused the death of the famous animals.

An early theory was that small mammals ate dinosaur eggs, and another suggested that toxic angiosperms (flowering plants) killed them.

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