Boeing provides airlines after the crash of Lion Air to the flight manual

Boeing provides airlines after the crash of Lion Air to the flight manual

In a statement issued on Tuesday, the aerospace manufacturer said it had issued an "Operations Manual Bulletin", informing airlines how to handle faulty cockpit readings.

A Boeing spokesman would not tell CNN whether the directive is the same as the 610 flight to operators of all Boeing aircraft or only to those flying 737 MAX 8 aircraft.

The Directive directs operators to "existing flight crew procedures to respond to circumstances where erroneous inputs are made by an AOA sensor," the statement said. "Whenever appropriate, Boeing publishes bulletins or recommendations for operating its aircraft as part of its usual procedures."

An Angle-Angle (AOA) sensor is a wing that is external to the aircraft and gives the pilot a visual indication of the angle of attack of the aircraft – or the angle between oncoming air or relative wind and a reference line in the aircraft or wings, "says Boeing.

"It's very important because it tells them if the plane is flying too high, which can lead to aerodynamic wing arrest (loss of lift)," said Airlineratings.com aviation analyst and editor-in-chief. Geoffrey Thomas.

Boeing said the Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee had "stated that the Lion Air flight 610 had received erroneous inputs from one of its AOA sensors (angle of attack)."

Boeing is involved in ongoing investigations into the Indonesian National Road Safety Committee and other government agencies over the crash of Lion Air and "continues to work together fully and provide technical assistance."

Following the Boeing Bulletin, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced on Wednesday that it would issue an airworthiness review to the Boeing 737 Max 8 crews if they had the same issues as Lion Air Flight 610.

A statement states: "The FAA has alerted affected domestic carriers and aviation authorities overseeing airlines using the 737 MAX."

The FAA policy recognizes no problem with the entire fleet of 737 Max 8 aircraft (the same model as Flight 610), and no similar issues have been reported in the US.

Problems on the last four flights

The Boeing statement is based on a number of significant developments in the investigation of the fatal aircraft disaster after flight data recorders of Flight 610 were detected last Thursday.

On Tuesday, Indonesian investigators found that the Lion Air flight had a flawed airspeed indicator for its last four flights – and, crucially, at the time of the crash, according to Tjahjono.
The airspeed indicator on the remaining Lion Air aircraft was faulty on the last four flights

Investigators who analyzed the Flight Data Recorder (FDR) after the October 29 crash uncovered the problem, Tjahjono said. The finding is the first technical problem uncovered in the investigation of the crash of the aircraft.

"Together with the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Boeing, we are formulating detailed airspeed indicator inspections," Tjahjono said Tuesday.

Lion Air Group CEO, Captain Daniel Putut Kuncoro Adi, told CNN on Wednesday that Lion Air is strictly following Boeing's instructions to operate the 737 MAX 8s as described in the Maintenance Manual.

Lion Air Crash: Getting the plane off the seabed is a challenge

"Pilots write in the logbook about the problem they had during the flight, then our technicians repair it and write (what) they do in the logbook," the manager said, adding that technical discussions between pilots and technicians related to the aircraft written and signed in a document called Aircraft Flight and Maintenance Log.

However, analysts have asked why the plane did not run aground sooner than the problem with the airspeed indicator problem first appeared.

"The question is why this plane was not taken out of service and the problem system was removed," said Geoffrey Thomas.

The Lion Air Group CEO told CNN that the Boeing service manual does not include instructions for lowering the aircraft, even if a recurring problem occurs.

"As long as we fix the problem and the technician explains that the plane can fly safely, the pilot will fly the plane, because that means the plane is safe," said Captain Daniel Putut Kuncoro Adi.

The plane was intact when it crashed, investigators say

Lion Air Flight 610 was intact with engines running as it crashed into the Java Sea at high speed, Tjahjono said Monday.

Tjahjono said that due to the small size of the debris found and the loss of the aircraft's engine blades, the investigators had determined that Flight 610 did not explode in the air but was "in good shape" before crashing 13 minutes after launch.

Lion Air Crash: Signal lost from black box, searchers say

Some of the victims' families on board Flight 610 were taken by boat to the site of the crash site on Tuesday to pray for their relatives and personally see the recovery process, said Muhammad Syaugi, head of the Indonesian search and rescue agency.

He said his team is still working to locate the Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), which he believes is buried beneath the deep mud.

After a ping from the CVR on Saturday, the dive teams were unable to hear a signal from the unit.

Meanwhile, the plane's other black box, the flight data recorder, was on Thursday, and investigators said flight 610 had 19 flights – including the last flight.

Jo Shelly, Bianca Britton, Rene Marsh and Gregory Wallace of CNN contributed to this report

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