Britain's first double hand transplant patient can now open his door

Britain's first double hand transplant patient can now open his door

Britain's first double-hand transplant patient can now open its own door for the first time in five years.

Chris King, 58, lost both hands – except for the thumbs – in an accident involving a metal press in 2013.

After a pioneering operation two years ago in July, he was able to reuse his hands from a donor.

Until now, he had trouble opening his front door-though he had written a letter of thanks to his surgeon, lifted a beer, and held his niece's hand.

Mr. King said, however, that he had finally regained his "freedom" after pushing the key into the lock to open the door for the deliverer.

Chris King, 58, lost both hands - except the thumbs - in an accident with a metal press machine four years ago at work (with his donor hands)

Chris King, 58, lost both hands - except the thumbs - in an accident with a metal press machine four years ago at work (with his donor hands)

Chris King, 58, lost both hands – except the thumbs – in an accident with a metal press machine four years ago at work (with his donor hands)

Mr. King of Rossington, South Yorkshire, remembered how he got used to having no hands for three years and abandoned himself to live an adapted life (picture after the accident).

Mr. King of Rossington, South Yorkshire, remembered how he got used to having no hands for three years and abandoned himself to live an adapted life (picture after the accident).

Mr. King of Rossington, South Yorkshire, remembered how he got used to having no hands for three years and abandoned himself to live an adapted life (picture after the accident).

He wants to emphasize the importance of people who come forward as potential donors and was weepy when asked about the donor who helped him (picture after the accident).

He wants to emphasize the importance of people who come forward as potential donors and was weepy when asked about the donor who helped him (picture after the accident).

He wants to emphasize the importance of people who come forward as potential donors and was weepy when asked about the donor who helped him (picture after the accident).

He said to The Mirror, "The reason why it took so long is that the key presses against my index finger and it was painful.

"But the other day Amazon came with some packages and I thought" I'll try again ".

"I tried the key and it worked. I shouted, "I did it. I did it for the first time. "

"The deliverer seemed a bit dumbfounded. I told him that I lost my hands in 2013 and got new ones in 2016, and he just said, "Wow, that's awesome." "

Mr. King went through the procedure to replace his hands the British Technical Center in Leeds General Infirmary.

After the surgery, he recovered and said that he could not wish for anything better and described it as "better than a lottery prize".

Mr. King went through the process of replacing his two hands at the United Kingdom's specialized center at Leeds General Infirmary

Mr. King went through the process of replacing his two hands at the United Kingdom's specialized center at Leeds General Infirmary

Mr. King went through the procedure to replace his hands at the British Technical Center in Leeds General Infirmary

After the surgery, he recovered and said that he could not wish for anything better and described it as "better than a lottery win".

After the surgery, he recovered and said that he could not wish for anything better and described it as "better than a lottery win".

After the surgery, he recovered and said that he could not wish for anything better and described it as "better than a lottery prize".

In the following weeks after the 12-hour surgery, he was able to fill a glass of Yorkshire ale from a bottle (a letter with a letter).

In the following weeks after the 12-hour surgery, he was able to fill a glass of Yorkshire ale from a bottle (a letter with a letter).

In the following weeks after the 12-hour surgery, he was able to fill a glass of Yorkshire ale from a bottle (a letter with a letter).

How the tedious operation was done step by step. Mr. King said the operation was a complete success as he already had some moves immediately after the procedure

How the tedious operation was done step by step. Mr. King said the operation was a complete success as he already had some moves immediately after the procedure

How the tedious operation was done step by step. Mr. King said the operation was a complete success as he already had some moves immediately after the procedure

WHAT HAPPENS IN A HAND TRANSPLANT?

After successful operations, with time and expert follow-up, the donor hand moves with power and skill.

It even feels warm to hurt and heal – but the surgery is long and complex.

During the six- to twelve-hour procedure, surgeon teams remove the donor hand while separate teams work on the recipient.

Bones are connected with titanium plates and screws. As with a typical broken bone, they should eventually heal together, but the plates remain in place to ensure stability.

Surgeons then connect important tendons and muscles before connecting blood vessels.

Once the blood circulates, the remaining nerves, tendons, and muscles become attached, just as the feeling in the hand should come back.

A one-hand transplant costs around £ 50,000, another £ 2,000 to £ 3,000 a year for rehabilitation and drug costs.

In the weeks following the 12-hour surgery, he was able to pour half a liter of his favorite Yorkshire beer out of his bottle.

Nine months later, he announced that he had written a letter to thank his surgeon, Professor Simon Kay, who performed the operation with eight other physicians.

Yorkshire pub-owner Mark Cahill was the first person in the UK to receive a hand transplant in 2012 – conducted by the same surgeon as Mr. King.

But Mr. King of Rossington, South Yorkshire, whose sister Amanda is now his full-time caregiver, was the first person to replace both hands.

Mr. King, a devotee of the Leeds Rhinos, said he could perfectly remember his horror, but said there had been no pain and no trauma.

He revealed that he was locked up at his workplace – Eaton Lighting in Doncaster – for six minutes before the first helpers arrived.

After the terrible incident, he nearly died in the ambulance, but a team of "unsung heroes" at Sheffield Northern General Hospital saved his life.

They also managed to rescue enough of his lower limbs to facilitate the later transplant operation at LGI – which proved to be a great success.

The Trust, which led the hospital, was honored in 2016 by the NHS England as a specialist in hand transplants in the United Kingdom.

Mr. King returned shortly after the operation to fix the donor's hands – and previously said his company was "brilliant."

Last year, Professor Kay, who hopes the procedure will become as routine as a kidney transplant, said he was dissatisfied with Mr. King's progress.

Mr. King, a devotee of the Leeds Rhinos, said he could perfectly remember his horror, but said there had been no pain and no trauma

Mr. King, a devotee of the Leeds Rhinos, said he could perfectly remember his horror, but said there had been no pain and no trauma

Mr. King, a devotee of the Leeds Rhinos, said he could perfectly remember his horror, but said there had been no pain and no trauma

Professor Simon Kay, who performed the operation with eight other physicians, praised Mr. King's recovery

Professor Simon Kay, who performed the operation with eight other physicians, praised Mr. King's recovery

Professor Simon Kay, who led the operation along with eight other physicians, praised Mr. King's recovery

Last year, Professor Kay (pictured together), who hopes the procedure will become as routine as a kidney transplant, said he was dissatisfied with Mr. King's progress

Last year, Professor Kay (pictured together), who hopes the procedure will become as routine as a kidney transplant, said he was dissatisfied with Mr. King's progress

Last year, Professor Kay (pictured together), who hopes the procedure will become as routine as a kidney transplant, said he was dissatisfied with Mr. King's progress

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