Cancers will kill nearly 10 million people worldwide in 2018

Cancers will kill nearly 10 million people worldwide in 2018

One in five men and one in six women worldwide will develop cancer during their lifetime, and one in eight men and one in eleven women die from the disease, according to global figures released Wednesday (September 12th).
Cancer continues its "alarming" progression worldwide with 18.1 million new cases and 9.6 million deaths in 2018, according to the latest estimates from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC / CIRC), which depends on the World Health Organization (WHO).
Lung cancer, killer number one
Lung cancer is by far the most deadly with 1.8 million deaths (18.4% of the total). It is ahead of colorectal cancer (881,000 deaths, 9.2% of the total), stomach cancer (783,000 deaths) and liver cancer (782,000 deaths), according to these new estimates for 36 cancers in 185 countries.

# GLOBOCAN2018 the global estimates of cancer incidence & mortality is live! Data show 10 cancers cause 65% of newly-diagnosed cases & deaths. Trends show contrasts between & within countries. Read the press release https://t.co/221P9EShn0, explore the data https://t.co/jUMQqYzSUA pic.twitter.com/Rlk2PXByRX
– IARC (@IARCWHO) September 12, 2018

Without skin cancer other than melanoma, removed to make a comparison with previous years, new cases of cancer in the world reach 17 million in 2018 against 14 in 2012 according to the previous estimate.
"These new figures show that much remains to be done to respond to the alarming increase in the global burden of cancer and that prevention must play a key role," said Dr. Christopher Wild, Director of IARC, based in France. In Lyon.
Concentration in Asia
"Effective prevention and early warning policies need to be implemented urgently to complement treatments to combat this devastating disease worldwide," he said in a statement.
Cancer at work: "I heard it all, even said, 'It smells of hospital here'" Nearly half of all new cases and more than half of all cancer deaths worldwide in 2018 occur in Asia, mainly in China, partly because this region accounts for almost 60% of the world's population.
43.8 million people live with cancer in the world within five years of diagnosis, notes the specialized agency.
Lung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and is the leading cause of cancer death with about one in five deaths.
"Worrying increase" among women
The report highlights the "worrying increase" in lung cancer among women: it is the leading cause of cancer death among women in 28 countries.
Sport does not cure cancer, but it can help It's in North America, Northern and Western Europe (including Denmark and the Netherlands), China, Australia and New Zealand the highest rates of new cases among women, with Hungary leading the way.
Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women (627,000 deaths).
It also accounts for about a quarter of new cancer cases diagnosed among women worldwide. Next, in terms of new cases, colorectal cancer in developed countries and cervical cancer in developing countries.
The increase in cancers is due to several reasons such as population growth, aging and the increase in the frequency of risk factors such as smoking, obesity, lack of exercise, unbalanced diet.
Important role of risk factors
In countries with rapid economic growth, cancers linked to poverty and infections (liver, stomach, cervix) can progress to cancers associated with lifestyles more typical of industrialized countries, observes IARC.
4 out of 10 cancers are preventable (with a healthier lifestyle) Prevention must take into account the impact of different cancers by sex, region or country, and be targeted accordingly, according to the authors.
One-third to two-fifths of new cancer cases could be prevented by eliminating or reducing exposure to known lifestyle and environmental risk factors, according to recent studies, the authors note in their article. in "CA", a cancer journal for clinicians.
"Policymakers are not aware of the degree of progress and the benefits of prevention," they regret.
(With AFP)

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