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The ballots for the Tempe mail elections in March were mailed to voters starting this week.

Mayor Mark Mitchell and former city councilor Corey Woods are competing for Tempe’s first elected post.

Five others run for three seats on the board: incumbents Randy Keating and Joel Navarro and first-time candidates Casey Clowes, Doreen Garlid and Marc Norman.

PLUS: Candidates for mayor and municipal councilor speak in debate of the Republic

Ballots must be returned or delivered to a voting center before 7 p.m. March 10th.

Here is a closer look at each candidate, how much money they have raised until December 31 and their three main themes.

Casey Clowes

Casey Clowes (Photo: Paulina Pineda / The Arizona Republic)

Casey Clowes

Years: 28.

Previous Public Service: Chairman of the subcommittee on faith and nonprofit of the Tempe 2020 Census Complete Counting Committee.

Job title: Lawyer.

Campaign funds raised: $ 20,846.

The 3 main problems and how you would address them:

  • Build a sustainable community.
  • Improve the quality of life of all residents.
  • Increase the affordability of housing.

I will improve Tempe’s sustainability efforts by strategically increasing our urban tree canopy, improving the ability to walk and improving our public transportation.

I will improve the quality of life for residents of all ages by making Tempe a child-friendly city, a great place to grow your career and the best city for seniors.

I will increase accessibility by expanding affordable housing and workforce options, supporting Tempe’s Mortgage Assistance and Emergency Rental programs to keep people in their homes during an emergency and fight to guarantee a living wage and family leave for city employees.

A coalition of East Valley city administrators is exploring ways to address homelessness, including the possibility of permanent shelter in the East Valley. Would you support a permanent refuge in the East Valley? In Tempe?

I was raised to believe in the inherent value and dignity of each person. Because of this belief, I believe it is imperative that we adopt a compassionate approach with the homeless. No one should be forced to sleep in the streets.

We must implement a comprehensive approach to end homelessness. We should work to increase affordable and workforce housing so that people working in Tempe can afford to live in Tempe, create a strong safety net to keep families staying and prevent homelessness when an emergency occurs, and Use a home first, but not just home approach, for the homeless.

I support permanent support homes located in all areas that need it, including an emergency shelter to provide people with a place to rest at night, an address to help people apply for jobs and benefits, and a place that can be combined with resources in addition to increasing the construction of affordable housing to provide homeless people a place to live and prevent homelessness from occurring.

Residents have sometimes disagreed with city officials on issues such as development and public safety. Does the city need to improve its relationship with residents? How would you do it?

It is important that decision makers meet with the residents where they are; whether in a public meeting, a community forum, a local event, by email or through an online application system to speak.

So far, my campaign has knocked on almost 14,000 doors in Tempe. We have had thousands of conversations with Tempe residents and I heard that the majority of Tempe residents mention Tempe’s affordability and sustainability near their main concerns. I also heard that residents feel they are not informed until a decision has already been made. I think it is important for the city to inform residents not only of a decision, but also to include them in the decision-making process and the reasoning behind it.

Doreen Garlid

Years: 56.

Previous Public Service: Chairman of the Tempe Neighborhood Advisory Commission, Tempe Impacts Education Foundation and board member of the Newtown Community Development Corp., president of the Tempe Buena Vista Ranchos Owners Association, Wagonner Elementary School and Kyrene Middle School PTO Vice President, Seton Catholic Preparatory School PTO Vice President and 2020 Tempe MLK Diversity Award winner for raising Navajo culture and history through free community talks called “Navajo Stories of My Mother”.

Job title: Former business manager of the newsroom of KSAZ-TV Fox 10.

Campaign funds raised: $ 45,295.

The 3 main problems and how you would address them:

  • Give voice to neighborhoods.
  • Improve public safety.
  • Advocate for more affordable housing.

As the current president of the Tempe Neighborhood Advisory Commission, I am very familiar with the challenges that Tempe neighborhoods face every day. In giving voice to neighborhoods, I believe we need to empower residents to speak for their community and hold our city leaders accountable to really listen to their concerns and act in accordance with residents’ recommendations. Staying true to the character areas of our neighborhood is an important part of my plan to achieve this. I also believe that the current structure of the commissions depends a lot on the staff; I am working to turn it around and make it more run by residents.

To improve public safety, we must support our public safety personnel with better recruitment, retention, training and professional development and restore our public safety budget to where it was before the recession.

And finally, to increase our offer of affordable housing, I think we should look for higher density residential where it makes sense. We should also more strongly encourage adaptive reuse, affordable development projects, accessory housing units in low-density areas and lower rents with existing owners.

A coalition of East Valley city administrators is exploring ways to address homelessness, including the possibility of permanent shelter in the East Valley. Would you support a permanent refuge in the East Valley? In Tempe?

Yes, I am in favor of efforts to bring permanent shelter to the East Valley. I recently participated in the count of homeless people at a particular time in Tempe to better understand this complex issue. Many of the people I talked to, including the social services experts of my walking team and people who were experiencing homelessness, said there simply isn’t enough shelter available, particularly for certain demographic groups, such as Single adult men. As long as we don’t have a place to go to the homeless, we will have people living in our streets and sleeping in our parks.

For a permanent refuge, we need to see what makes the most sense for all of us from a regional perspective. It is important to keep in mind that we cannot expect a single city in East Valley to carry the full load from a programmatic or financial point of view, we must work in partnership. So, yes, as long as Tempe residents support it and there is a compromised regional commitment, I am on board with efforts to bring permanent shelter to the East Valley.

Residents have sometimes disagreed with city officials on issues such as development and public safety. Does the city need to improve its relationship with residents? How would you do it?

Absolutely. This is a main focus of my campaign. As president of the Neighborhood Advisory Commission, I am already making changes to try to improve the relationship between neighborhoods and the city to set the tone for a more productive dialogue that is driven by residents rather than staff. The city should not make arbitrary changes with wide implications without the acceptance and input of the residents. I believe that the decisions we make as council members should give high priority to the wishes of the residents, and I am committed to ensuring that neighborhood voices are heard.

Developing strong relationships with neighborhood leaders and being proactive in encouraging ongoing dialogue through outreach efforts such as community-based topic forums are key to knowing how we can best serve our community.

As president of the Association of Owners of Buena Vista Ranchos, I know the importance of maintaining positive and working relationships with city leaders and staff and what it is to move the neighborhood problems forward. Cultivating key relationships to work collaboratively towards solutions is one of my greatest strengths and I trust my ability to improve our dialogue around complex neighborhood problems.

Randy Keating

Years: 37.

Previous Public Service: Member of the Tempe City Council since 2016, founding member and current member of the Tempe Young Professionals board of directors and member of the Kiwanis Club of Tempe.

Job title: Marketing manager.

Campaign funds raised: $ 51,313.

The 3 main problems and how you would address them:

  • Affordable housing
  • Public spaces.
  • Traffic.

We need to do everything possible to provide relief to our overloaded real estate market. More people want to live in Tempe than we have houses to house them. Creative solutions that combine housing and retail, such as the Tempe Maker District, are part of the answer, but we need to press the Legislature to revoke the prohibition of inclusive zoning, which prohibits us from demanding affordable housing in new developments.

Many of our parks and roads are not at the level that the Templars deserve, due to a decade of deferred maintenance due to the Great Recession. I will continue to be a strong advocate of accelerating investments in our public spaces, with the objective that annual funds return to pre-recession levels. I also want to reinstate our park ranger program to make our public spaces safer.

It is no secret that Tempe has a traffic problem, particularly in our downtown area. We must explore ready-to-use solutions to move people through our city more effectively. These possible solutions include expanding orbit routes, rapid bus transit, bus departures, enhanced intelligent signage, pedestrian overpasses, roundabouts and continuing to promote multimodal options. I don’t think there is a unique approach for everyone, so any solution should respect that different areas have unique needs.

This answer was edited only for the word limit.

A coalition of East Valley city administrators is exploring ways to address homelessness, including the possibility of permanent shelter in the East Valley. Would you support a permanent refuge in the East Valley? In Tempe?

The Homeless Coalition of the administrators of the City of East Valley is the result of a working group in which I participated to address the issue of the homeless in Tempe. I am very happy that the city staff and their counterparts in our neighboring cities are working on a regional solution and I hope they have policy recommendations before the council soon.

Yes, I would support a homeless shelter in the East Valley as a regional association. Homelessness has increased 24% year-over-year in the Valley, and it is clear that the Legislature is not interested in helping Arizona cities handle this rapidly growing problem. It is up to us, the cities, to lead, organize and work together to address this growing humanitarian crisis.

Yes, I would support a homeless shelter in Tempe if it were a regional association, but I would like the support of the neighbors in the surrounding area where it would be built.

Residents have sometimes disagreed with city officials on issues such as development and public safety. Does the city need to improve its relationship with residents? How would you do it?

The city, and any government agency, can always do more to include its constituents in the decision-making process. Ultimately, we must make sure we represent the wishes of the people who live here and be the ones most affected by the decisions we make.

I think it is imperative that our residents have faith in the government of their city and its institutions. As members of the City Council, our job is to do everything possible to build that confidence and be effective communicators of what is happening and why.

That’s why I never refused a meeting when a resident requested one. I am always happy to hear Tempean’s concerns and do what I can to mitigate them. I listen to a variety of different voices and points of view and always work to find a midpoint.

If I am re-elected, I will continue to involve our neighbors in the current process and will work to improve that process to reach earlier.

Mark mitchell

Years: fifty.

Previous Public Service: Member of the Tempe City Council from 2000 to 2012, mayor since 2012, member of the Tempe Sister Cities, Kiwanis Tempe Club, Greater Phoenix Economic Council, president of the Rio Salado Foundation and the Maricopa Government Association.

Job title: Business development, Clayton Floor Covering and Design.

Campaign funds raised: $ 168,909.

The 3 main problems and how you would address them:

  • Public security.
  • Quality employment
  • Quality of life for all Templars.

Jobs: Tempe has attracted more than 33,000 jobs since I was mayor, and I will continue to prioritize economic opportunities for all residents. Issues such as affordable housing and homelessness are reaching critical points in the cities of the region, and one of the best remedies we are seeing is a thriving economy where everyone triumphs.

Public safety: keeping our residents safe is paramount, and I am committed to equipping our response teams with the tools they need. We are not really safe unless we all feel safe in our homes and community. That is why I pledge to facilitate more conversations about community policing, scale reduction tactics and how we can win and maintain the trust of all residents.

Quality of life: Tempe’s goal is not only to grow but to grow better. This includes attracting well-paid jobs, protecting and improving neighborhoods and improving the ease and safety of transportation. Our public transport system, which is already the envy of the cities of the Valley, continues to expand. Tempe has strong neighborhood protection regulations and is investing $ 60 million over the next five years to improve neighborhood parks.

A coalition of East Valley city administrators is exploring ways to address homelessness, including the possibility of permanent shelter in the East Valley. Would you support a permanent refuge in the East Valley? In Tempe?

I am proud that Tempe is working with Maricopa County and the cities of Phoenix and Mesa to find the best solution to address the lack of a homeless shelter in East Valley. If that solution is a refuge in the city of Tempe, I would support it 100%.

What I want, and I believe what our partners want, is to discover where a shelter would be most beneficial for as many people and from there.

We also realize that a shelter is not a solution, but it will certainly help. We are working hard to expand programs that foster affordable housing and fight homelessness. In fact, Tempe spends a higher percentage of our budget (32% more) on human services than any city in the region, a fact that I am tremendously proud of. But we are not satisfied with the status quo and I hope to continue looking for innovative solutions to the challenges we face.

Residents have sometimes disagreed with city officials on issues such as development and public safety. Does the city need to improve its relationship with residents? How would you do it?

Coming and going among community members is not a new phenomenon. Talking with each other is how we learn and how we grow together.

For the most part, Tempe residents are happy with the direction in which the city is headed and with the operation of the city. Our recent citizen satisfaction survey indicated that 78% of residents are very satisfied / satisfied with the availability of information about the city. That said, there is still a lot of work we can do to improve communication with neighborhoods, developers and community members who feel their concerns are not heard, and I will continue working to make sure that each resident has a voice and a seat in the table.

Joel Navarro

Years: 52.

Previous Public Service: Member of the Tempe City Council since 2008.

Job title: Fireman, city of Phoenix.

Campaign funds raised: $ 28,325.

The 3 main problems and how you would address them:

  • Providing excellent public safety.
  • Attracting good jobs.
  • Improved aging infrastructure.

The highest priority of any local government should be to keep its citizens safe. Tempe has experienced tremendous growth, and it is important that we maintain our public safety needs as the population increases. As a firefighter, I understand the challenges facing public safety and know what works. In an emergency, seconds matter, and I hope to continue using my public safety experience to keep response times low in Tempe.

The attraction of good jobs has kept our economy strong. Tempe continues to bring the best employers to our city. We must continue to focus on strategic development by working with developers to find solutions that balance the needs of both current businesses and residents. Creating good jobs in Tempe helps keep property values ​​high and generates tax revenues to finance critical city services.

Finally, we must continue to improve our aging infrastructure as the population increases and the systems age. This includes streets, right of way, water delivery, sewerage, garbage collection and bulk collection. Maintaining these services is necessary to protect the high quality of life we ​​enjoy in Tempe.

A coalition of East Valley city administrators is exploring ways to address homelessness, including the possibility of permanent shelter in the East Valley. Would you support a permanent refuge in the East Valley? In Tempe?

I support the idea of ​​a permanent refuge in East Valley. I am proud of the work that our city manager, staff and council have done to address homelessness in Tempe. This is a difficult issue that requires compassion and careful consideration to provide assistance and protect neighborhoods.

Currently, Tempe uses a “rotating” night system to achieve this balance by providing housing for those in need, while easing the burden of neighborhoods. This system rotates the location of open shelters to provide safe shelter at night, while minimizing the impact on the surrounding neighborhood. I believe that a system like this should be used in a regional approach when addressing a problem such as homelessness.

Finding adequate housing is only the first step in helping those in need. As a member of your council, I have created programs that address the mental health, drug addiction and housing needs of residents. I pledge to continue this work to help those in need and protect the high quality of life that we all enjoy in Tempe.

Residents have sometimes disagreed with city officials on issues such as development and public safety. Does the city need to improve its relationship with residents? How would you do it?

Smart growth and excellent public safety have been the top priorities in my three terms as a member of your board. The City Council has addressed many other difficult issues during my tenure and the best solutions have always come after all, to participate in a meaningful dialogue. In an efficient government, there is rarely a “one size fits all” solution. I always strive to understand all positions and achieve a balance when making difficult decisions.

We enjoy a high quality of life in Tempe thanks to our dedicated and active neighborhood advocates. Tempe must continue our tradition of relating to all neighbors. While I believe that Tempe staff does an excellent job of communicating with our residents, we should always strive to do better.

I promise to continue to maintain my “open door policy” with any Tempe resident who seeks to provide feedback on a problem in our community. I appreciate the education and information I receive from community members in my regularly scheduled “Java with Joel” events. I look forward to working together to continue delivering strong results for Tempe and our neighborhoods.

Marc Norman

Years: 52.

Previous Public Service: Volunteering.

Job title: Musician, animator.

Campaign funds raised: $ 13,995.

The 3 main problems and how you would address them:

  • Homelessness.
  • Affordable housing
  • Traffic.

Homelessness: establish measures to track the effectiveness of current programs. Partner with private and nonprofit organizations to address the growing homeless population in Tempe, partner with other municipalities to achieve a holistic and sustainable solution.

I would propose that we work with Arizona State University to find a permanent solution to the problem. If there was ever an opportunity to take advantage of a crisis to be a teaching opportunity, this is the opportunity. Sustainable housing plus mental health problems plus substance abuse plus the cycle of poverty amounts to an interdisciplinary learning program focused on identifying the causes and systems that contribute to homelessness. ASU and the University of Arizona would be a fantastic real-world environment to investigate and address these problems.

Affordable housing: we don’t need more luxury homes. We need sustainable and affordable places for people to live and prosper.

Traffic: congestion is getting worse. We need to stop adding high capacity residences without adequate systems to ensure mobility without cars.

A coalition of East Valley city administrators is exploring ways to address homelessness, including the possibility of permanent shelter in the East Valley. Would you support a permanent refuge in the East Valley? In Tempe?

I would support a partnership with universities. Unfortunately, no one would want a brick and mortar shelter in their neighborhood. And all too often, such places are synonymous with crime and drug use.

Residents have sometimes disagreed with city officials on issues such as development and public safety. Does the city need to improve its relationship with residents? How would you do it?

Public participation is the key, but it is an act of balance. If you stop everything to get information, the problems you are looking to solve get ahead and grow. However, if you do not get enough, then people who wish to express their views are not heard.

Growth is a problem and should decrease. The rubber stamp of the big development projects has to stop.

Corey woods

Years: 41)

Previous Public Service: Member of the Tempe City Council 2008-2016, board member of Newtown Community Development Corp., member of Landings Credit Union and Friendship Village, member and former president of the Tempe Kiwanis Club, former chairman of the board of Tempe Boys and Girls Club-Ladmo Branch, president of the Capital Cancellation of the Tempe School District 2012 and co-chair of the Maintenance and Operations Cancellation of the Tempe High School District in 2017.

Job title: Community Relations Officer, ASU Preparatory Academy.

Campaign funds raised: $ 124,063.

The 3 main problems and how you would address them:

  • Resolve our traffic crisis.
  • Proactively address our challenges with homelessness.
  • Create affordable housing opportunities for everyone.

As mayor, I will immediately produce a actionable plan to relieve traffic jams, minimize detours and reduce roadblocks. Better planning and multimodal coordination of construction projects will improve mobility, reduce congestion and reduce emissions. We also need to examine traffic patterns and adjust signal times to improve traffic flow.

Residents and business owners know that Tempe must do more to address homelessness. We must expand the successful Housing First program that I defended while on the council. This program places those who are not housed in stable units and wraps around social services to break the cycle of poverty. We must ensure that our dollars go to strategies that have proven successful.

While working on the council, I worked with neighborhoods, my council colleagues and the private sector to build long-term housing solutions for veterans (Value in 8th), seniors (Encore in farmer) and working families (Gracie’s Village). For my commitment, I was recognized with an award by the Arizona Department of Housing. If I am elected, I will defend proactive solutions that ensure that everyone, from recent graduates to older adults living on a fixed income, can call Tempe home.

A coalition of East Valley city administrators is exploring ways to address homelessness, including the possibility of permanent shelter in the East Valley. Would you support a permanent refuge in the East Valley? In Tempe?

I believe that a permanent refuge in East Valley or Tempe is an idea that should remain absolutely on the table if our residents support it. However, this concept should be a component of a much broader strategy that should include proven solutions such as expanding Housing First, creating more transitional housing and supporting the current programs managed by our religious community and other respected community partners.

We must also ensure that we are focusing on programs that empower people to finally break the cycle of homelessness, such as job training and mental health.

I really believe that one of the reasons why homelessness is such a persistent problem in Tempe is because of our lack of transitional housing options. Our interfaith community does an exceptional job of offering beds and services, but we know that the need is now much greater than the offer. We need to better support the work that is currently being carried out, evaluate the effectiveness of our other programming and ensure that other cities in the East Valley are doing their part to help.

Residents have sometimes disagreed with city officials on issues such as development and public safety. Does the city need to improve its relationship with residents? How would you do it?

Yes. My team and I have spoken with thousands of Tempe residents, and a constant message we receive is that they do not feel heard when it comes to city problems, especially when it comes to development. They also regularly tell me that our residents want to actively participate in the difficult conversations surrounding public safety. We must work diligently to restore that trust with our citizens.

Improving relationships is a matter of being open to feedback and not being afraid of having difficult conversations. Durante mi tiempo en el Concejo Municipal, construí una reputación de ser proactivo y accesible. Negocio soluciones construyendo consenso.

Si habla con los líderes del vecindario de Hudson Manor, ellos le dirían cómo trabajé en colaboración con ellos y Gorman and Company para construir un proyecto de vivienda asequible que mejorara el carácter del vecindario y proporcionara vivienda para familias trabajadoras. Ese es solo uno de los muchos ejemplos de mi enfoque, que es acercar a las personas a la mesa y resolver problemas para los residentes de Tempe.

Llegar a la reportera Paulina Pineda en [email protected] o 602-444-8130. Síguela en Twitter: @ paulinapineda22.

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