Canon arraigned because its all-in-ones don’t scan when ink runs out – ICT news

The US division of tech maker Canon is being summoned to court because its printers would refuse to perform scans or forward faxes when it runs out of ink.

This is about a group complaint brought by the complainant David Leacraft. This man is a Canon customer and is suing the company for false advertising, among other things. The problem is, a few devices simply don’t work, when they run out of ink, according to the complaint. Functions like scanner and fax, for which the user does not need ink at all, would also be unusable.

This is a problem that has been well known since 2016 following answers provided by the helpdesk to other customers. The official solution is that the device must be equipped with the correct ink cartridges to use all printer and scanner functions.

‘Misleading’

In the complaint, Leacraft points out that he would not have bought his ‘all-in-one’ printer, had he known that he always had to have ink on hand, even for scanning. a document. The packaging mentions three different functions: print, copy and scan, without indicating that they all require ink.

Tech site BleepingComputer, which searched Canon’s support forums, further unearthed messages indicating that color ink should always be present in the device, even for printing in black and white, ‘otherwise the device may be damaged’.

What’s not helping is that devices unethically attempt to force people to buy ink, even if they don’t need it. The printing market is one of the most expensive in the world. However, ink cartridges expire quite regularly. Many printers are therefore sold at a particularly tight price as manufacturers assume that the shortfall will be made up by purchasing ink cartridges.

‘There is no technical reason to develop an All-in-One printer equipped with an ink level detector ensuring that the scanner stops working when there is little or no ink left’, can we read in the complaint. ‘Canon has designed All-in-One Printers so that customers are required to carry enough ink, regardless of whether they want to print or not.’ The group lawsuit was filed in a New York court last week, but has yet to be declared admissible there.

This is about a group complaint brought by the complainant David Leacraft. This man is a Canon customer and is suing the company for false advertising, among other things. The problem is, a few devices simply don’t work, when they run out of ink, according to the complaint. Functions like scanner and fax, for which the user does not need ink at all, would also be unusable.This is a problem which has been well known since 2016 already following answers provided by the helpdesk to others clients. The official solution is that the device must be equipped with the correct ink cartridges to use all printer and scanner functions. In the complaint, Leacraft states that it would not have purchased its printer. all-in-one ‘, if he had known that he always had to have ink on hand, even when scanning a document. The packaging mentions three different functions: print, copy, and scan, without indicating that they all require ink. Technology site BleepingComputer, which searched Canon’s support forums, further unearthed messages indicating that there should always be colored ink in the machine, even for black and white printing, ‘otherwise the machine may be damaged’. is that devices unethically attempt to force people to buy ink, even if they don’t need it. The printing market is one of the most expensive in the world. However, ink cartridges expire quite regularly. Many printers are therefore sold at a particularly tight price as manufacturers assume that the shortfall will be made up by purchasing ink cartridges. There is no technical reason to develop an All- printer. in-One equipped with an ink level detector ensuring that the scanner stops working, when there is little or no ink left, ‘we read in the complaint. ‘Canon has designed All-in-One Printers so that customers are required to carry enough ink, regardless of whether they want to print or not.’ The group lawsuit was filed in a New York court last week, but has yet to be declared admissible there.

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