Ceasefire Centenary commemoration in New Zealand

Ceasefire Centenary commemoration in New Zealand

Today, at 11 am, New Zealand is celebrating the centenary of the ceasefire, which ended World War I in 1918, ended the war years and ushered in a time of peace.

Thousands of New Zealanders attend memorial service at the Auckland War Memorial Museum and Pukeahu National War Memorial Park.

A scheduled overpass in Auckland with three World War I aircraft two minutes ago silence was dropped into the can due to weather conditions at Ardmore Airport.

There will be a salute with 100 pistols on Wellington's waterfront. People line the harbor to see. The echo of the pony can be heard at Pukeahu Memorial Park.

Veteran Chris Mullane is the master of ceremonies at the ceremony in Auckland.

Gently, rain fell on the crowd. Mullane commented as it rained in remembrance that it was the tears of the fallen.

After a two-minute silence followed by a roaring chorus of cheering sounds
"Celebrate peace and hope for the future".

During this exultant celebration, churches, emergency service sirens and naval vessels were heard in Auckland in Devonport.

The installation of 18,277 white crosses at The Domain in Auckland lasted four and a half days.

This is a cross for every kiwi life lost in the war.

Among the crosses there is a special area devoted to the mothers who have lost two or more sons. Nine mothers lost four sons, 53 mothers lost three sons and 638 mothers lost two sons.

The 100-Gun salute marks the centenary of the ceasefire that ended World War I
The 100-Gun salute marks the centenary of the ceasefire that ended World War I

and 12 Jewish soldiers are also among the remembered.

Soldiers were known for their last victim in the war, but behind-the-scenes nurses were often not recognized for their hard work.

Tracey and Katherine Meeten wanted to create awareness.

They were commemorated in replicated nurse uniforms from 1915 "Corsets and Everything".

"We have a British family who served, we have no nurses in the family, but we represent them

"They had to fight for recognition and many of them were not paid and provided their own uniforms," ​​Tracey said.

It took four and a half days for 18,277 white crosses to be installed on The Domain. Photo / Greg Bowker
It took four and a half days for 18,277 white crosses to be installed on The Domain. Photo / Greg Bowker

Poppies decorate the chests of family members to commemorate relatives who have sacrificed their last victim for their land.

The sun is shining in the Pukeahu National War Memorial Park. Hundreds of people were already gathering for the centenary of the ceasefire.

Governor General Dame Patsy Reddy and Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will pay their respects in the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior and speak later in the ceremony.

A five meter high truce fire shows news from people across New Zealand.

Kiwis were invited to send their messages of hope, peace and remembrance.

A message says, "I want the recognition of the soldiers who left and gave their lives so that we could have a free life." Others call names of family members who lost their lives in the war.

Around 100,000 New Zealanders – or ten percent of the population at that time – served abroad during the war and more than 18,000 were killed.

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