Channel 4's Food Unwrapped: Why tea tastes better from a cup?

Channel 4's Food Unwrapped: Why tea tastes better from a cup?

Most Britons will agree that there is something more comforting than a cup of tea, especially now that the weather is getting colder.

Now, psychologists have proven that tea from a cup tastes really better than when we drink it from a takeaway mug.

In Channel 4's unpackaged food, psychologist Charles Spence of the University of Oxford said that the severity of a mug makes the drink inside of better quality, since drinks in paper cups tend to be from cheaper, less upscale restaurants come.

Professor Spence tested the theory that one is tastier than the other by challenging a group of volunteers to try one drink from a table marked A and another from a table marked B.

On Monday night, Food Unpacked experts on Channel 4 revealed that tea in a cup tastes better for us because our brains are trained to be nicer than a cardboard cup (picture photo).

On Monday night, Food Unpacked experts on Channel 4 revealed that tea in a cup tastes better for us because our brains are trained to be nicer than a cardboard cup (picture photo).

On Monday night, experts revealed that the food on Channel 4 was unpacked, that the tea in a cup tastes better for us, because our brains are trained to be more beautiful than a cardboard bowl (photo of the file).

All volunteers said they preferred the "sweeter" drink A and said that drink B had a "bland" taste.

Professor Spence revealed that the two teas were exactly the same drink. The only difference was that he added a weight of 30 g to the bottom of Drink A, the preferred mug.

He explained, "What we feel in our hands can have as much impact as what is in the cup or mug when it comes to what we taste."

The psychologist explained that our minds regard weight as a quality trait, and we always believe that cups of tea are nicer when they come in a heavier container.

He added, "People can not separate the tea from the container, it's almost as if your brain uses that weight as a quality feature, which is the case in many categories."

And it seems that the preference for tea in a cup lies in our heads, because there is no physical evidence that a cup of tea is better than a cup.

Oxford University psychologist Charles Spence said that the container into which our drinks come can affect taste as much as the beverage itself. Fig. From left to right: physicist Stephen Blundell, presenter Kate Quilton and Prof. Spence on Food Unwrapped

Oxford University psychologist Charles Spence said that the container into which our drinks come can affect taste as much as the beverage itself. Fig. From left to right: physicist Stephen Blundell, presenter Kate Quilton and Prof. Spence on Food Unwrapped

Oxford University psychologist Charles Spence said that the container into which our drinks come can affect taste as much as the beverage itself. Fig. From left to right: physicist Stephen Blundell, presenter Kate Quilton and Prof. Spence on Food Unwrapped

All volunteers preferred the drink from Table A.

All volunteers preferred the drink from Table A.

The volunteers described the tea from Table B as "bland"

The volunteers described the tea from Table B as "bland"

Prof. Spence asked a group of volunteers to sample a paper cup of tea from Table A (left) and Table B (right), and everyone said that Drink A tasted good before the psychologist realized it was the same drink

Prof Spence placed 30g weights on the bottom of the higher rated drinks (pictured), as he proved that our brains are trained to make heavier containers better food or drink inside

Prof Spence placed 30g weights on the bottom of the higher rated drinks (pictured), as he proved that our brains are trained to make heavier containers better food or drink inside

Prof Spence placed 30g weights on the bottom of the higher rated drinks (pictured), as he proved that our brains are trained to make heavier containers better food or drink inside

The physicist at the University of Oxford, Stephen Blundell, tested this with a cup and a paper cup containing tea from the same brew.

He found that a porcelain cup cooled the tea much faster than a paper cup. Therefore, a paper cup should seem to produce a nicer cup of tea.

He said, "This is because the paper cup contains many layers with a few air gaps, making it a very good insulator, a bit like wearing a pullover."

Moderator Kate Quilton also turned to the people on the street to ask if they would prefer tea in a cup or paper cup, and everyone said they preferred it from a cup because it "tasted better."

Unpackaged items will be broadcast on channel 4 at 20:30 on Mondays

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