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Chasing solidity in a liquid world

“We live in a constant search for an indefinite contract that can be extrapolated to any area of ​​our day to day. We pursue solidity while diving in kilos of planned obsolescence”

Monica Perez

Among the messages of encouragement that went viral in the first months after the global outbreak of covid-19, a better society was predicted the moment we left behind the unknown scenario of global urgency in which we found ourselves. «We will come out better» «Once this happened, we will be stronger». We automatically shared affirmations tinged with hope that promised to return us to a different scenario where we would squeeze life in a rational and conscious way, in which we would adopt a new perspective and balance the scales. We would re-learn to live, to discern what really matters.

Two years later, something has changed. It is happening in fashion with a mass flight from ‘fast fashion’ bringing us closer to quality purchases that stand the test of time by our side, but also in our relationships and in any other reality of our lives.

In a world conquered by the liquid age, there is a shared need to cling to seemingly solid things. We desperately search for something capable of standing the test of time by our side: a bag that will last for years by our side, relationships for “life”, an impulsive signing of a mortgage knowing that we may change cities six months later, commitments insurmountable that we categorically assure will last forever. But is it really a choice or a necessity? We live in a constant search for an indefinite contract that can be extrapolated to any area of ​​our day to day. We pursue solidity while diving into kilos of planned obsolescence. In the most superfluous and fleeting era of history where photos are deleted in 24 hours, we talk to 14 people at the same time and in a week we visit three cities without even stopping to look around, we devastate Tinder looking for a love story like that of our grandparents, like those of before, without understanding that the formula was different then.

Two years after the global outbreak of the coronavirus, I wonder what became of the tsunami of claims that marked the months of confinement. Have we come out better? Let me doubt it. We remain the same, but with a revelation: we are not invincible. Hoping to become perennial, we build our own limits based on our fears. Let’s face it: we are not better, but we are more vulnerable, fragile and unarmed. Exasperatedly looking for a bunker with invisible walls, a blanket that keeps us afloat.

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