The wife of a top Trump White House official went on Twitter raid on Wednesday morning before vaccination, falsely suggesting that deadly measles virus might be beneficial.

Darla Shine, a former producer of Fox News, is the wife of Bill Shine, a former manager of Fox News and current deputy chief of staff at the White House for Communications. Her screaming was triggered by a CNN segment at the outbreak of measles in Washington and Oregon, which has so far affected more than 50 unvaccinated people.

"Here's going to LOL #measlesoutbreak on #CNN," she wrote in response to the segment. "#Fake #Hysteria."

"The entire population of Baby Boom living today had the #Measles as children," she added bizarre. "Bring back our #clinic diseases, keep you healthy and fight cancer."

The MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) vaccine has repeatedly been recognized by scientists as safe and effective against measles, resulting in painful rashes that may affect organs and cause death, especially in those whose immune systems are compromised.

Nonetheless, Shine doubled her claim to vaccination, suggesting that her measles was similar to a child with chickenpox and lifelong immunity. "I had the #Measles #Mumps #HhickenPox as a child and every kid I knew," she wrote. "Unfortunately, my children had #MMR, so they will never have the lifelong natural immunity that I have. Come on, breathe! "

Shine is right that as a child, measles prevented her from getting the disease again, but she is mistaken that her children who have received the MMR vaccine are "sad."

Since the disease was eradicated in the US in the early 1990s, those born after that time have no immunity to fight the disease. Shine's children were not only protected from potential death, but could also protect others from herd immunity from contracting the disease – or the idea that most people in a population had the vaccine, as a "herd."

In fact, most measles deaths are children under the age of 5 and adults over the age of 30 who are not vaccinated. Measles provide immunity after the disease is over, but can cause serious life-long problems such as blindness, encephalitis (brain swelling), and severe respiratory disease, which can lead to pneumonia and death.

After several tweets, she accused her critics of being "trolls" or "trolls."Democratic russian bots"Shine went so far that the measles virus kills cancer.

Of course, Shine's claim that measles prevent cancer is completely wrong.

The research she quoted was a clinical experiment in which six myeloma patients had received a "concentrated, laboratory-developed measles virus," according to a 2014 CNN story. Basically, the measles virus linked cancer cells together and then exploded what the immune system should do, but was not done for cancer patients. The experiment succeeded in sending one patient to remission, but the other patients did not respond.

The irony? The virus given as part of the therapy was structured in a similar way to a measles vaccine.

Shine's comments demanded immediate contempt from prominent media officials who noted that the wife of a high-ranking White House official is actively spreading anti-vaccine conspiracy theories.

Shine's comments come at a critical time in the vaccine debate. Just last week, the Vaxxer Robert F. Kennedy jr. – the nephew of President John F. Kennedy – testified at a hearing in Capitol Hill that there is a bill requiring all kindergartners and / or day-children to be vaccinated.

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