Demand for Irish passes is increasing as Brexit nears

Demand for Irish passes is increasing as Brexit nears

The demand for Irish passports at the British Embassy has increased as the clock encounters Brexit.

CCCCC, the year before the EU referendum.

Figures released to Fine Gael's Neale Richmond, chairman of the Brexit Committee in the Irish Senate, show that nearly 45,000 applications were submitted in the first half of 2018.

Mr. Richmond points out that the "impending catastrophe of Brexit" caused the legitimate British to reconnect with their Irish heritage.

He said, "Since the United Kingdom's population just left the EU in 2016, the number of applications for Irish passports in the United Kingdom has grown steadily.

"Under current rules, Irish parents or grandparents with a right to citizenship can apply for an Irish passport.

"It is estimated that at least 10% of the population of the UK, with the exception of Northern Ireland, qualify for an Irish passport. In the face of Brexit, many, including some of my family members, are entitled to an Irish passport.

"Figures provided to me by the Irish embassy in London have shown that there are no signs that Irish passports are easing."

The figures show that 46,229 applications were submitted in 2015, 63,453 in 2016 and 80,752 in 2017, "he said.

"The figures for the first half of 2018 show that the number of applications received by the London Embassy has already reached 44,962.

"Embassy officials predict that 2018 will be the busiest year for Irish passport applications in the UK.

"While many in the UK are dealing with the impending Brexit catastrophe, we need to take advantage of the positive aspects of this new wave of people connecting with their Irish heritage. Our post-Brexit relations in the UK and Ireland can build on a strong, connected diaspora. "

In our no-deal scenario, the UK would experience a moderate four- to five-quarter recession
S & P

Pointing to the economic damage that a Brexit deal failed to reach, the analysis by global rating agency Standard & Poor's (S & P) indicated that the UK was experiencing higher unemployment and a slump in house prices would plunge a recession.

"In our no-deal scenario, the UK experienced a moderate four- to five-quarter recession, with a GDP decline of 2.7% over two years. Then the economy would grow again, although the pace of growth would be moderate, "said the S & P newspaper.

"By 2021, economic output would still be 5.5% lower than what would have been achieved if a deal had been made and a transition had taken place.

"Unemployment would rise from current lows of 4% to over 7% by 2020 (a rate last seen after the financial crisis). House prices would probably fall by 10% over two years. "

The agency said it expected a deal to close, but "the risk of a no-deal Brexit on March 30, 2019 is still not our base case, but has grown sufficiently to become a relevant valuation consideration."

Theresa May and Philip Hammond will dispel Wednesday's concerns over Brexit's corporate leaders.

The Prime Minister and the Chancellor will talk to more than 100 supervisors and investors in a gathering to inform them about the budget.

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