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Dermatologist shares the exact order you should apply to your skin care products

From serums to elixirs, oils, creams, gels and more when it comes to skin care, there is a wide range of choices – so much so that it can be confusing to know what's doing. But even if you have the most effective skin care that can buy money, if you apply your products in the wrong order, you may not reap the full benefits, or worse, harm your skin when you use active ingredients. Here, in conversation with FEMAIL, the dermatologist Dr. Natasha Cook the exact sequence in which you should apply your skincare products and the ingredients that you should never mix.

In a conversation with FEMAIL, the dermatologist Dr. Natasha Cook provided the exact sequence in which you should apply your skin care products, and the ingredients that you should never mix (Stock Image).

As a general rule of thumb, when applying skin products of the thinnest consistency, you will need to get the thickest – or fluid to oil – serum before the moisturizer comes. The Right Order for Skin Care 1. Cleanser: Removes surface debris and prime skin to aid absorption. Serum: Concentrated serums sit best on the skin where the active ingredients can penetrate.3. Moisturizer: As it is thicker, it generally takes longer to absorb and hydrate. Face Oil: Apply it on top as it takes the longest to absorb it.5. SPF: Must sit on the outermost skin layer for optimal effect. Source: Dr. med. Natasha Cook As a general rule of thumb, you need to go from the thinnest consistency to the thickest – or from liquid to oil – when applying skin products: "The first step in any skin care is to cleanse," Dr. Cook told FEMAIL. "This will help remove surface debris and prepare the skin for the absorption of your active ingredients." Once your skin is clean, it's time to pick up all the serums with active ingredients – and "layer" them on your face: serums are concentrated but light and they usually contain high levels of active ingredients It's best to sit on the skin, "she said. Use these before oils or moisturizers to absorb the ingredients and not be diluted. "

"Serums are concentrated but light and they contain significant percentages of active ingredients that are best on the skin," Dr. Cook (pictured: Lauren Curtis). Moisturizer is essential for a well-functioning skin and should be part of every routine, "Dr. Cook said." Because such creams are thicker, it generally takes longer for them to move in and slowly into the mouth After the moisturizer, the time for any facial oil – which should never be applied before the moisturizer – as a water-based product will not absorb so well. & # 39; Finally, apply sunscreen to your skincare regimen & # 39 ;, she added, "You want your SPF agents to sit on the skin surface, just under the makeup."

After the moisturizer is the time for any face oil – this should never be applied before the moisturizer as the water based product does not absorb so well

Dr Cook (pictured) also unveiled the skin ingredients that should never be mixed – including vitamin C and retinol or other acidic products such as AHAs and vitamin B3 with AHAspecaking via the "cocktailing" or "layering" approach to skincare. Cook while it's good, you can also go overboard: ingredients that should never be mixed together – and what you should do instead * Do not mix: Vitamin C with retinol or other acidic products like AHAs (Alpha Hydroxy Acids). * MIX: Vitamin C with Niacinimide or Vitamin E. * Do not mix: Vitamin B3 and AHAs. * DO MIX: Retinol with hyaluronic acid. * Do not mix: benzoyl peroxide and retinol unless you can stabilize it. * Mix: Retinol and Glycerin. "It's a good idea, to some extent," she said. "But you can always layer on too many products and cause skin confusion or cause skin problems." Not only that, but there are some ingredients – like retinol and benzoyl peroxide – that should not be mixed together. "If you use a vitamin C serum, stop using it at low pH or other acidic products like AHAs (or alpha hydroxy acids)," Dr. Cook. "Instead, vitamin C will work well with serums containing niacin imide or vitamin E." Vein blending of vitamin B3 and AHAs could cause redness and possible irritation. Instead, use your drying retinol products with something intensely moisturizing such as hyaluronic acid. "Simplify your routine as much as possible, if you want to see results," Dr. Cook said. Find serums that have a combination of ingredients so you do not have to use too many, and then, to make things easier, use one serum in the morning and one at night.

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