Distinguished three forms of depression for the first time - with one helps no drug

Distinguished three forms of depression for the first time - with one helps no drug

About four million Germans suffer from a depressive disorder. There are more than 300 million worldwide. Being depressed is considered to be someone who suffers from a heavy mood depression over a longer period of time. Those affected can usually not get themselves out of the hole and slip instead for weeks, months or years deeper and deeper into it. The symptoms can occur completely independent of external circumstances such as blows of fate, personal problems or stress. Concerned people feel the emptiness deep inside, are hopeless and impotent and usually have difficulties to peel themselves out of bed. Often, depression also includes physical symptoms such as headache or stomach ache, decreased libido or sleep disturbances.
In the case of depressives, the brain metabolism is out of balance. As a reason for these serious changes, researchers have already shown that in depressed people, the metabolism in the brain is confused. At least one of the two messengers serotonin and norepinephrine is not present in the optimal concentration. As a result, the nerve cells can no longer communicate properly and impulses between brain cells can no longer be properly transmitted. Nowadays, depressive disorders can be treated quite well. Anyone who sets out to visit a specialist can, in most cases, be completely cured with the right therapy methods. 30 percent of patients do not benefit from antidepressants. In addition to psychotherapy, medications are often used, at least temporarily. So-called serotonin reuptake inhibitors are among the most prescribed antidepressants. They should help to bring the messenger substance serotonin in the brain back into balance. In the majority of cases the treatment is also successful. But in about 30 percent of patients, the drugs cause no improvement. Why that is so far was a mystery to the scientists. However, Japanese researchers may now come a long way from the solution. "This is the first study to identify subspecies of depression from life history and MRI data," said Kenji Doya of the Okinawa Science and Technology Institute. He was looking for a new approach to depression research with a team of scientists.For their study, researchers looked at life situations and brainscans. Their study included 67 people with depressive disorder, and another 67 people without depression formed the control group. Researchers tested the 134 participants on MRI, completed clinical questionnaires, and looked at more than 3,000 different signs of depression. At the MRI, researchers looked at the functional connectivity in subjects' brains. Even at this point, they could distinguish two groups: a group in which functional connectivity was rather low, they called it the D3 group; and one where she worked well. The researchers were able to divide it once more into two subgroups: one that was the victim of maltreatment and trauma in childhood, the researchers called it the D1 group, and a group that did not have childhood trauma, the D2 group Medicines only worked in two of the three groups. They found that the serotonin reuptake inhibitors only worked in two of the groups. Obviously, the D3 group is one of them, but also in those affected without disturbing the connections between the different brain regions, they had an effect: in those who did not carry any trauma from their childhood, the D2 group. However, in the group with childhood trauma, the D1 group, the serotonin reuptake inhibitors showed no effect. "It has always been suggested that various types of depression exist. They also affect the effectiveness of the drugs, "explains Doya. Further Studies Are Needed To substantiate these findings and to draw further conclusions, further studies with more participants are needed. However, the researchers are already hoping that the methodology will provide a new guideline for health scientists to better understand the complexities of depression and to better identify their patients. Why you should go to the doctor with permanent itching immediately

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