DR MAX THE REPLY DOCTOR: Brighten! Even bad jokes are good for you

DR MAX THE REPLY DOCTOR: Brighten! Even bad jokes are good for you

When did we lose our sense of humor as a nation? When did we disregard our ability to distinguish jokes (good or bad) and irony from threats or true malice?

William Sitwell, the editor of Waitrose Food magazine, resigned from his job this week after killing a hilarious email about vegans who had turned to a vegan journalist who had given him an idea he did not was so sharp.

He seems to have jumped before he was pushed by the publisher of the magazine. All I can say is that he gets tricked by the vegan brigade, as well as the thousands of social media users who jump on every old car that rolls a long time.

As I continued to develop the series, I read Sitwell's email again – and wondered how anyone could have taken seriously what he said for a moment.

What a serious, serious bunch we are, always on the lookout for more and more ridiculous things to be offended.

When did we lose our sense of humor as a nation? When did we disregard our ability to distinguish jokes (good or bad) and irony from threats or true malice?

When did we lose our sense of humor as a nation? When did we disregard our ability to distinguish jokes (good or bad) and irony from threats or true malice?

When did we lose our sense of humor as a nation? When did we disregard our ability to distinguish jokes (good or bad) and irony from threats or true malice?

Whether it's Jamie Oliver's recipe for jerk chicken (cultural appropriation) or Swim England, which recommends women with flabby stomachs not to wear bikini (body shaming), an excess of political correctness has us in such a crippling grasp that it's ours Laughter ability now limits us and others.

And that worries me. When we lose our collective sense of humor, we also lose one of the most important psychological tools to deal with the adversities of life.

Freud argued in his 1905 book, "Jokes and Their Relationship to the Unconscious," that these jokes express thoughts or ideas that society tries to suppress. They give us the opportunity to talk about things that are otherwise too difficult, complex or painful to discuss in public.

Now Sitwell's joke was not funny, but it touched a sense of irritation many of us identify with. Who did not get annoyed when another email requesting an answer reaches their inbox.

And there is no question that some vegans are self-righteous and selfish and disapprove of anyone who does not follow their beliefs. I think that's what Sitwell's misjudged e-mail in For him, it was a temporary release. Freud argues that such a reaction is like venting steam to avoid an explosion.

William Sitwell, the editor of Waitrose Food magazine, resigned from his job this week after killing a hilarious email about vegans who had turned to a vegan journalist who had given him an idea he did not was so sharp

William Sitwell, the editor of Waitrose Food magazine, resigned from his job this week after killing a hilarious email about vegans who had turned to a vegan journalist who had given him an idea he did not was so sharp

William Sitwell, the editor of Waitrose Food magazine, resigned from his job this week after killing a hilarious email about vegans who had turned to a vegan journalist who had given him an idea he did not was so sharp

Yes, this is a trivial example, but if we do not "vent" it is detrimental to our mental health. Taking everything to heart seldom helps our unconscious to solve the difficulties we experience in life because some problems are too difficult to properly investigate.

But humor can do that for us.

In fact, after the most stressful experiences, I've often laughed the most. I remember one night when I went to the teacher's room in A & E. It was busy but quiet, just with a hiss of a kettle.

An anesthetist came in: "That was tough," he said, looking around. "Well done. I think we did our best. "

A pager started and someone left the room. Tea was made and poured, and gradually people spoke. The atmosphere began to lift.

Someone had a rubber glove and put it on his head and pretended to be a chicken. Suddenly we all laughed and joked.

A casual observer could scarcely have believed that many of these people were close to tears 30 minutes earlier when they fought, but did not fail to save the life of a six-year-old boy who was the victim of a car accident.

One of the hardest things about being a doctor is the relentless confrontation with death and the fear and pain of others. One moment you tell someone that his child has died – and the next you see an old woman who has fallen and needs to refresh herself reassuringly.

You need to focus on the patient in front of you and forget what happened before, no matter how bleak

This requires a number of complex coping mechanisms. Sometimes this is black humor – doctors and nurses are famous for it – but often it's easy to snoop around.

Jokes, slapstick and jokes are a way to deal with the cruel brutality of our work. The mess of the doctor is for the mess. But life can be hard for all of us – and jokes help us cope with it. We need humor. And the idea that someone can now lose their job through a stupid joke is no laughing matter.

Make your wishes clear

One in ten would refuse to donate their organs if the government's plans for a policy of "alleged consent" in England were continued, according to a survey.

The directive means that anyone who did not want his organs to be used after his death must register his wishes in advance.

That means they would have to pull out of the system – while future donors will have to opt for the NHS donor registry as things stand.

While the lack of available organs is a problem and many patients die while on the waiting list, the alleged consent raises significant ethical issues that make me uncomfortable.

While the lack of available organs is a problem and many patients die while on the waiting list, the alleged consent raises significant ethical issues that make me uncomfortable.

While the lack of available organs is a problem and many patients die while on the waiting list, the alleged consent raises significant ethical issues that make me uncomfortable.

While the lack of available organs is a problem and many patients die while on the waiting list, the alleged consent raises significant ethical issues that make me uncomfortable.

Currently, organ donation is an act of altruism of an individual: the alleged consent works on a social level, and I wonder how a government can make assumptions about an individual's desires after death.

It's a massive state intervention in our lives.

Of course, I'm not saying that people should not donate their organs, except that it can be assumed that we will not. Incidentally, since the introduction of alleged consent in Wales in 2015, the number of donated organs has not increased.

The real problem we need to address is why 40 percent of families say no to the question of organ donation from a loved one. A presumptive approval makes no difference here, because families still have the ultimate veto.

What we should do instead is to encourage everyone to voice their wishes before they die.

Is combating loneliness the key to defeating dementia?

There are now 850,000 people with dementia in the UK, whose numbers are growing rapidly – an increase of 35 percent by 2025 and 146 percent by 2050.

Increased life expectancy and improved diagnosis are part of the explanation, but we also know that social, genetic and environmental factors play a role. Therefore, huge sums are invested in researching the reasons why the level rises so fast.

A new American study came to mind this week, where the development of dementia was linked to the epidemic of loneliness of the elders.

Loneliness can trigger inflammatory reactions in the brain that, according to researchers, can lead to neuronal changes related to dementia.

A recent American study came to mind this week, when the development of dementia was linked to the epidemic of loneliness in the elderly (image).

A recent American study came to mind this week, when the development of dementia was linked to the epidemic of loneliness in the elderly (image).

A recent American study came to mind this week, when the development of dementia was linked to the epidemic of loneliness in the elderly (image).

People are sociable and live from social interaction – never in human history have so many older people been so isolated from their families and communities.

Once they have lived near their offspring or sibling or shared a home with them. Now, families are scattered across the country and beyond, and the divorce has further shattered and weakened family ties.

The influence of loneliness on dementia rates has been shown in people with hearing impairment who suffer as a result of social isolation and have higher rates of dementia.

Interestingly, for people with hearing aids, dementia rates are the same as for people without hearing loss.

As we search desperately for a drug to cure dementia, I wonder if there is a much simpler answer.

Can a vegan diet help people with type 2 diabetes lose weight and even reverse the disease? A new study designed to prove that has been recognized by vegans as proof that a diet free of meat, fish and dairy products is healthier than the one that contains them.

Such a claim is not the subject of an audit. While patients who followed a vegan diet declined more on average, this was because a plant-rich vegan diet tends to be lower in calories than other diets and therefore causes weight loss. That's hardly news. Veganism is not very healthy – and indeed it is easy to lack the vital nutrients that are more common in "forbidden" foods.

Dr. Max writes … Bemyeyes

This ingenious mobile app allows every visually impaired person in the world to receive immediate help from a sighted person.

As a volunteer, you download the app, complete a short registration, and wait to be called.

If someone with vision problems needs help – for example, to check the expiration date on a milk carton – he uses the app to contact a registered volunteer. The first person to answer their video call is connected.

My first call was from a young woman who wanted to know if the letter she had received – she showed me the envelope over the video link – was junk mail or a bill. It did not take more than 30 seconds. Volunteers may be contacted once a month, so it's not a big commitment – but it can change one day.

The latest celebrity-driven health craze is "Alkaline Water", as drunk by Beyonce. It has a higher pH than normal water – and so, according to the advocates, it helps to neutralize the acidity in the body.

This is total Bunkum. First, any "alkalinity" is eliminated by the highly acidic content of the stomach. Second, the digestive tract becomes increasingly alkaline anyway to optimize nutrient uptake.

Our body has evolved over millions of years to make sure that the pH is tightly controlled.

Why, at a time when we have more access to first-class information than ever before, will we still be aware of pseudo-scientific claims and marketing hype?

If you want to drink something, just turn the faucet.

Leave a comment

Send a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.