First human death of rabies since 1944 in Utah in the United States

In the United States, Utah, public health officials have reported that one patient died of rabies. It is suspected that bat exposure was the source of the infection. He is the first resident to die of rage since 1944.
In Utah, people and animals are the most likely to come into contact with rabies because of exposure to bats. Anyone bitten by a bat, in direct contact with a skin or with a bats. other potential contact with a bat should contact his doctor or the local health department to find out if he needs to be treated for rabies. Utah law requires all domestic dogs, cats and ferrets to receive an anti-rabies vaccine. Pet owners are encouraged to check with their veterinarian for more information.
In addition to vaccinating pets, it is recommended to: never touch a bat.
leave the bats out of his home;
seal the cracks and holes through which bats can enter a house;
keep the animals indoors and watch them when they are outside;
report stray animals to local authorities. Call local animal control officials to report stray dogs and cats;
do not approach stray animals;
in domestic animals, signs of rabies may include behavioral changes, general illness, difficulty swallowing, increased saliva and saliva, and bites of all, if excited.
Rabies reminders
Rabies is
 a life-threatening disease if not treated in time. The treatment
prevention of human rabies is very effective if administered
quickly after contact with the carrier animal.
The contamination of man is exclusively by an animal with
contact with saliva by biting, scratching, licking on excoriated skin or
 on mucous membrane (eye, mouth). The animal can become contagious 15 days
before the onset of the first symptoms of the disease and the rest
to his death. If the animal is alive and has no symptoms
after an observation period of 15 days from the date
exposure (bite or other exposure), he could not transmit the
 rage at the person bitten.
To reduce the risk of contracting rabies it is recommended to avoid contact with pets, bats or wild mammals.
In case of bite, scratch or licking on a wound:
It is imperative to clean the wound with water and
 soap for 15 minutes, rinsing, application of an iodized antiseptic
or chlorinated, are essential to limit the risk of infection.
It is then necessary to consult a doctor who will decide the necessity
vaccinal anti-rabies treatment and administration
immunoglobulin-specific anti-rabies, in the absence of vaccination
 preventive.
Preventive vaccination may be recommended for expatriates and
 travelers at risk (hikers, children, cyclists, speleologists,
subjects having contact with animals). Preventive vaccination
does not dispense with curative treatment, which must be implemented on
as soon as possible in the event of known or suspected exposure, but
simplifies treatment and dispenses with the use of immunoglobulins, which
 are not always available in developing countries.
For the traveler, detailed information is available on the websites Mesvaccins.net or Medecinedesvoyages.net.
Source: Outbreak News Today.


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