First-time voter Gracie Lou Phillips of Grand Prairie Texas died 82 days after the first ballot

First-time voter Gracie Lou Phillips of Grand Prairie Texas died 82 days after the first ballot

When 82-year-old Gracie Lou Phillips counted in North Texas last week, "she danced a little jig" around her walker, then sat down and threw her fists in the air, her family said.

"I have chosen!", She explained.

Until then, Phillips of Grand Prairie had never held a poll – the result of misunderstandings about voting and the belief that she had no voice, her family said.

However, her son-in-law, Jeff Griffith, said that voting for Phillips in recent years has become extremely important and wanted to have a say in the 2018 mid-term elections.

Although Phillips was seriously ill, she made her first Grand Prairie election on Thursday.

She died on Monday.


Gracie Lou Phillips, 82, holds up her "I Voted" label after casting her vote in the early poll in Grand Prairie, Texas (Terri Griffith).

Phillips was a beautician; Her husband Bill worked in the construction industry.

They had their hands full for seven children, and Griffith said his mother-in-law had never voted because her husband had always been worried that he would be called as a jury member and "can not make an end meet. "Besides, he did not want them to be political, fearing that this could affect the business, the family said.

But after watching the elections in recent years, Griffith said his mother-in-law wanted to attend.

She applied for election but was diagnosed with pneumonia and sepsis, Griffith said. Still, he said, while Phillips was in the hospital, she kept talking about the election.

"She asked," Can not I vote somehow? Do not you let people choose from the hospital? ", He said. "It was really important to her." He added when she got home, "she insisted.

On Thursday afternoon, Phillips, who was in hospice care, went to the polls – a church near her home.

Phillips, who was traveling on oxygen, stayed in the vehicle and the polls brought her a paper choice, Griffith said. When she was done, she said, they clapped and cheered.

A video of her family showed Phillips sitting in the car with a souvenir pen and a sticker in his hand.

"I voted today," she said, reading the words printed on the seal.

But the next morning, Phillips could not get up or drink her morning coffee, her family said.

"She said," At least I voted, "her son-in-law recalls," it was one of the last coherent things she said to us. "

She died shortly before 2:00 am on Monday with her daughters by her side, but her choice was recorded.

"She was very proud," Griffith said. "She wanted to drain the swamp. She has elected directly to Republican. "

He added, "She was very happy. She kept saying she could finally vote. "

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