From Colombia to Mexico: "Narcos" moves into a new house

From Colombia to Mexico: "Narcos" moves into a new house

Netflix arrives at the fourth season of the successful narcoserie that, on this occasion, with Escobar out of the picture, will explore the war in the Aztec country against drugs
                    
                      

                      Diego Luna gives life to the capo Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo, founder of the powerful Guadalajara cartel that had its apogee in 1980 and then derived in the Sinaloa / netflix cartel
                
          The fourth season of the series "Narcos" explores the origins of the war in Mexico against drugs, a chapter that in the opinion of the creator of the program, the American Eric Newman, "is unthinkable" without narrating the history of the Guadalajara Cartel.

"You can not tell the story of 'El Chapo' Guzmán without introducing Félix Gallardo, Caro Quintero or Ernesto Fonseca, the capos who modernized the drug trade in the 1980s, in complicity with the Mexican government," Newman said at a meeting with the press in Mexico City.

After three successful seasons portraying the birth and development of drug trafficking in Colombia with Pablo Escobar at the helm, the popular Netflix series now lands in Mexico, where Felix Gallardo takes command and unifies traffickers to build an empire.

In "Narcos: Mexico," which arrives on the platform on November 16, Mexican actor Diego Luna gives life to capo Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo, founder of the powerful Guadalajara cartel that had its heyday in 1980 and then led to the cartel Sinaloa.

Luna shares the leading role with Mexican-American Michael Peña, who in the program plays Enrique 'Kiki' Camarena, the first DEA agent killed in action.

After Felix Gallardo's apprehension in 1989, Rafael Caro Quintero and Ernesto Fonseca Carrillo assumed the leadership of the Guadalajara Cartel, which began drug trafficking to the United States on a large scale.

"It is important to understand where this was born (drug trafficking), what its origins are, how a group of small producers and traffickers end up taking power and their link with the Mexican and US governments," said Mexican actor Tenoch Huerta.

Huerta plays Caro Quintero, who was imprisoned in 1985 and released in 2013. His whereabouts are currently unknown.

"The complexity of the relationship between Mexico and the United States is that both continue to sponsor this war. And while history ('Narcos') has elements of fiction, we have an obligation to tell the truth as completely as possible, "said Newman.

Since the beginning of the so-called war against drug trafficking led by former President Felipe Calderón in 2006, more than 200,000 people have been killed, according to official figures that do not specify how many of those victims are linked to the fight against crime.

A QUESTIONED ROLE

In "Narcos: Mexico," Diego Luna plays the capo Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo, founder of the once powerful Guadalajara Cartel, a role that has earned him criticism from a political sector in his country that accuses him of "doing apology for drug trafficking."

But the Mexican actor responds with the argument that the fourth season of the program broadcast by Netflix is ​​a "good opportunity to trigger the interest of those who are not yet sensitive to a serious problem."

In the hands of drug traffickers and a controversial anti-drug operation, a wave of violence has been unleashed in Mexico that leaves more than 200,000 violent deaths in 12 years, according to official figures that do not detail how many would be linked to organized crime.

"From my point of view it is important to tell this story during the decade (1980) in which the scaffolding was made of what has us living in this hell," Luna said during the presentation of the series.

After the disappearance of the Guadalajara cartel, in the 1990s arose the powerful Sinaloa cartel, led by Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán, now imprisoned in the United States and waiting for a lawsuit against him in November.

His protagonist in the new installment of "Narcos", his debut in a series, was announced in March, when Luna protested against the Law of Internal Security, which regulates the participation of the Armed Forces of Mexico in public security tasks.

Among those who accused in social networks the actor in the Star Wars saga "Rogue One" of contradicting his speech by starring in a program "that advocates crime", highlights the then conservative senator Javier Lozano.

"I respect the opinions of everyone, except those of those who ask not to tell these stories and talk about 'nice things,'" Luna said.

"I'm very interested in that audience that sees the series in Germany, England and other countries outside of Latin America, the next time a line of cocaine is going to be put in, think a little about what's behind it," said the producer.

          .

Leave a comment

Send a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.