Genes would explain why some people can strengthen their muscles faster

The inherited characteristics answer 72% of the results that a training gives (JM GUYON)

A team of scientists from the Anglia Ruskin University of the United Kingdom he discovered that 13 genes would be responsible for the way the body responds to physical exercise. They estimated that these Inherited characteristics answer 72% of the results that a training gives. The rest corresponds to other factors such as diet and nutrition in general.

Researchers from that university, in Cambridge, reviewed 24 previous studies to determine how genetics affect fitness training results. The study findings were published in the journal PLOS ONE

The most prominent findings indicate that people with “Good” genes can make your muscles stronger and fit faster. This would explain why, for some, getting their muscles in shape is still difficult to achieve.

For a series of exercises designed to improve muscle strength, the team found that the genetic difference accounted for 72% of the variation in fitness results.

The researchers concluded that 13 genes are responsible for how the body reacts to cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, and anaerobic power exercises.

All participants showed improvements in physical condition after their physical training, but in varying degrees (Gettyimages)
All participants showed improvements in physical condition after their physical training, but in varying degrees (Gettyimages)

Based on their findings, the scientific team suggested that genetic testing could be used to better tailor the exercises to each individual to achieve the best results.

“We know that exercise is good for us, but We all improve at different rates, even when we follow identical training regimens. This means that there are other factors at play “, said the article’s author and sports scientist Henry Chung of Anglia Ruskin University.

In their study, Chung and his colleagues reviewed 24 previous studies, analyzing the results of experiments in a total of 3,012 adults ages 15-55 to assess how genetics can affect the impact of three major areas of physical exercise.

Those areas studied were: anaerobic power, cardiovascular fitness and muscle strength, what it represents, the team explained, key factors in shaping an individual’s physical fitness, quality of life, and well-being.

In each experiment, All participants showed improvements in physical condition after their physical training, but in degrees that varied even when the subjects followed the same exercise routine.

“Our study found 13 genes that play a role in exercise outcomes, and we found that the specific alleles contained in these genes are better suited for certain aspects of fitness.” Chung explained.

It should be possible to improve the effectiveness of an exercise regimen by identifying a person's genotype (Gettyimages)
It should be possible to improve the effectiveness of an exercise regimen by identifying a person’s genotype (Gettyimages)

“For example, with repetition exercises designed to increase muscle strength, genetic differences explained 72% of the variation in results between people who followed the same training ”, he specified is an expert. “Because the genetic makeup of each person is different, our bodies respond slightly differently to the same exercises. “

Therefore, It should be possible to improve the effectiveness of an exercise regimen by identifying a person’s genotype and then tailoring a specific training program just for that person.

“This could particularly benefit those who need to see improvements in a short period of time, like hospital patients or elite athletes, where marginal improvements could mean the difference between success and failure. “

The researchers also found that genetic variations were responsible for 44% of the differences in results observed after cardiovascular conditioning exercises and for 10% of the differences after anaerobic power exercises.

The remaining variations, they explained, are influenced by other factors, including diet and nutrition, recovery and injury.

The UK National Health Service (NHS) advises people aged 19-64 that to stay healthy you need to be active according to the following guidelines. At least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity, such as biking or brisk walking, each week and strength exercises 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms). 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity such as running or a one-on-one tennis match each week and strength exercises 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms). One guidance would be that 1 minute of vigorous activity provides the same health benefits as 2 minutes of moderate activity. One way to get the recommended 150 minutes of weekly physical activity is to do 30 minutes 5 days a week. All adults should also interrupt prolonged periods of sitting with light activities.

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