HEALTH INSTRUCTIONS: Gluten-free bread contains no important vitamins

HEALTH INSTRUCTIONS: Gluten-free bread contains no important vitamins

Jumping on the gluten-free train car could, according to new research, lead to serious nutrient deficiencies.

For celiac sufferers it is recommended to cut out the protein from wheat and other grains. But only five percent of the gluten-free breads on the supermarket shelves are fortified with calcium, iron and thiamine, critical to bone and brain health, according to the government's latest findings.

The regulations require British manufacturers to fortify bread flours (made from wheat) with calcium, iron, niacin and thiamine. But flours and bread without gluten, as represented by some prominent cooks such as Ella Woodward, are exempt from these provisions. Dr. Caroline Orfila, study author and associate professor of nutrition in Leeds, says, "Gluten-free foods must have the same nutritional standard as white wheat flour equivalents."

Crusade: Ella Woodward aka Delicious Ella

Crusade: Ella Woodward aka Delicious Ella

Crusade: Ella Woodward aka Delicious Ella

Care "Lottery" for deaf children

A surprising number of deaf children are denied critical treatment to improve their hearing, according to a new nationwide report.

A survey of 1,000 parents of hearing-impaired children of school age found that one in five regularly canceled or postponed important NHS appointments due to a "postcode lottery" of rationed treatment. Irregular schedules have resulted in one third of the 45,000 British deaf children not attending school for extended periods of time, and there are also long delays in repairing hearing aids. Susan Daniels, Chief Executive of the National Deaf Children's Society, said, "Every time a goal is missed, a deaf child must experience days of isolation at home, in the classroom, and on the playground."

A survey of 1,000 parents of hearing-impaired children of school age indicated that one in five was regularly canceled or postponed vital NHS appointments due to a "postcode lottery" of a rationed treatment (Figure).

A survey of 1,000 parents of hearing-impaired children of school age indicated that one in five was regularly canceled or postponed vital NHS appointments due to a "postcode lottery" of a rationed treatment (Figure).

A survey of 1,000 parents of hearing-impaired children of school age indicated that one in five was regularly canceled or postponed vital NHS appointments due to a "postcode lottery" of a rationed treatment (Figure).

According to a new study, it's only half a second to make a first impression.

The participants judged 60 different voices according to their attractiveness, dominance and trustworthiness, after they had listened to short excerpts of voices.

The same clips were played by two groups of participants. Half of the group listened to a single word, which lasted only half a second, and the other half heard a three-second sentence.

Glasgow School of Psychology researchers found that those who had heard the voices for just half a second were as confident as the participants who heard the full sentence. The lecturer Philip McAleer said, "There are many possible applications for this research, from voice-over to Artificial Intelligence, to help people feel better about creating more realistic language for people who have lost their ability to speak.

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