Health Minister Matt Hancock reveals plans to help Brits live another five years

Health Minister Matt Hancock reveals plans to help Brits live another five years
Matt Hancock says prevention is at the heart of the NHS 'long-term plan

Matt Hancock says prevention is at the heart of the NHS 'long-term plan

Matt Hancock says prevention is at the heart of the NHS 'long-term plan

The health advice is tailored to the classes, the lifestyle and the genetic make-up. The new strategy aims to give everyone in the UK five additional years of life.

Health and Social Affairs Minister Matt Hancock wants public health agencies to use personal information from millions of people to provide targeted advice on alcohol, diet and exercise.

The technique is referred to as "predictive prevention," where government data is used to direct different messages to those that it is likely to apply.

For example, pregnant women in Blackpool would receive smoking cessation messages, as the data shows they smoke much more often than elsewhere.

In a speech to be delivered today, Mr. Hancock says that prevention is better than cure, as he hopes to increase healthy life expectancy by 2035.

Boys currently expect a healthy life expectancy of 63 and one and a half years, another 16 years are bad. Girls can expect 64 years of healthy life plus 19 years of illness.

Mr. Hancock told The Sunday Telegraph that the advice could also be tailored to the individual's genetic makeup.

He said, "For example, if you partially sequence your genome, you can find out if you have a particular vitamin.

"A vitamin B12 deficiency leads to a higher rate of dementia, but can be prevented by eating broccoli.

"If we said to the population as a whole," you have to eat more broccoli, "this would not be as good as if people were sequencing their genomes [and] know that they have a special problem. "

Mr. Hancock will say, "We spend 97 billion euros of public money on disease, and only 8 billion euros to prevent it across the UK."

"You do not have to be an economist to see that these numbers do not pile up," he added, accepting that social-leveling advice could cause controversy.

People need to take more responsibility for their own health by eating less, quitting smoking and getting more exercise, Health Minister will say today

People need to take more responsibility for their own health by eating less, quitting smoking and getting more exercise, Health Minister will say today

People need to take more responsibility for their own health by eating less, quitting smoking and getting more exercise, Health Minister will say today

"One focus on prevention and prediction medicine is not just the difference between life and death, but the difference between being fit and active over the last 20 years of your life or suffering from chronic pain.

"Our focus must shift from treating individual acute illnesses to promoting the health of the entire individual."

Duncan Selbie, Chief Executive of Public Health England, said: "Investing in prevention is the smartest thing we can do.

"We need to move from a disease-recognizing and treating system to a system that also predicts and prevents health problems by promoting health in all policies, and empowering people to take care of their own health."

Mr. Hancock will also urge GPs and other community services to take the lead in relieving hospitals.

However, he will also say, "Prevention also means that people take more responsibility for managing their own health.

"It's about people choosing to take better care, stay active and stop smoking. By limiting alcohol, sugar, salt and fat make better decisions. "

The Health Minister adds, "The reason why prevention is right is important because it's the only way we can fight health inequalities."

Hancock will say that prevention will be at the heart of the long-term NHS plan, due later this year.

In return, the NHS will do more to identify and combat the causes of ill health by using genomics, working with employers, and improving housing.

Mr. Hancock will also announce that the government is presenting "realistic but ambitious targets" to further reduce salt levels by Easter.

He will speak at the annual meeting of the International Association of National Public Health Institutes today.

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