Heart-rending images show the "terrible" injuries that plastic garbage inflicts on British seals

Heart-rending images show the "terrible" injuries that plastic garbage inflicts on British seals

Heartbreaking images show the toll Britain's plastic waste crisis has on its seals.

Images show animals with plastic rings around their necks, some of which are cut deep into their action, hindering creatures' ability to move and hunt.

The RSPCA has warned that the number of seals with "frightening" injuries caused by plastic waste every year is the worst in ten years.

Items that cause such injuries – and even death – are, for example, fishing nets or plastic waste located in coastal areas such as Horsey Beach in Norfolk.

Known for its vibrant seal population, Horsey is a popular place for British seal tourism. Last year more than 1,600 puppies were born there.

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Pictured is a seal on Horsey Beach in Norfolk, at the neck of a plastic ring is attached. It is one of several heartbreaking images that show how much the plastic waste crisis in Britain is affecting their wildlife

Pictured is a seal on Horsey Beach in Norfolk, at the neck of a plastic ring is attached. It is one of several heartbreaking images that show how much the plastic waste crisis in Britain is affecting their wildlife

Pictured is a seal on Horsey Beach in Norfolk, at the neck of a plastic ring is attached. It's one of several heartbreaking images that show how much the plastic waste crisis in the UK is targeting wildlife

Alison Charles, manager of the RSPCA's East Winch Wildlife Center, Norfolk, said Man- delman-made items kill seals daily in the sea or on beaches.

"Seals are curious, so they're trapped in nets by fishing trawlers and the individual nylon strings and frisbees used in mackerel fishing.

"These poor animals get stuck and suffer horrible and often terrible disgusting slow deaths.

"You can not stretch your neck, so do not fish. It is absolutely terrible. "

The RSPCA has previously saved and treated between two and four seals each year, and none before 2008.

But last year, 10 seals were rescued with plastic and metal rings around their necks, as well as ropes and plastic nets they got tangled up in.

Images depict animals with plastic rings around their necks, sometimes cutting into the hustle and bustle of their bodies and hindering creatures' ability to move and hunt

Images depict animals with plastic rings around their necks, sometimes cutting into the hustle and bustle of their bodies and hindering creatures' ability to move and hunt

Images depict animals with plastic rings around their necks, sometimes cutting into the hustle and bustle of their bodies, hampering creatures' ability to move and hunt

The RSPCA has warned that the number of seals with "frightening" injuries caused by plastic waste every year is the worst in a decade

The RSPCA has warned that the number of seals with "frightening" injuries caused by plastic waste every year is the worst in a decade

The RSPCA has warned that the number of seals with "frightening" injuries caused by plastic waste every year is the worst in ten years

Items that cause such injuries - and even death - are, for example, fishing nets or plastic waste located in coastal areas such as Horsey Beach in Norfolk

Items that cause such injuries - and even death - are, for example, fishing nets or plastic waste located in coastal areas such as Horsey Beach in Norfolk

Items that cause such injuries – and even death – are, for example, fishing nets or plastic waste located in coastal areas such as Horsey Beach in Norfolk

"It's never natural objects, it's always plastic or metal or other things that should not be in the water," said Mrs. Charles.

Pictured is a seal rescued on Horsey Beach caught in a plastic fishing net

Pictured is a seal rescued on Horsey Beach caught in a plastic fishing net

Pictured is a seal rescued on Horsey Beach caught in a plastic fishing net

"I even saw a seal with a bikini around my neck, and when they get bigger and bigger, it cuts through the skin and they get an infection."

The charity Friends of Horsey Seals oversees the seals along the Norfolk coast, describing the situation as "simply awful".

Ms. Charles added that neither the RSPCA nor the Friends of Horsey were aware of the extent of the injured seals on the Norfolk coast, but that figure is increasing every year.

Friends of Horsey volunteer David Wyse said it was extremely difficult to rescue female seals being strangled by Frisbees.

To help one of the seals, they must be isolated and weakened by infection before they can be caught.

Mr. Wyse said, "The problem is that women are about to be born and any serious disorder in the group can lead to miscarriages."

Once one of the seals is taken, they will be treated with antibiotics for several months before being released.

The RSPCA had to drop a seal baby this year, however, as her nose was severed by a nylon cord.

Mrs. Charles said, "It had fallen so low when I removed the ring, I thought I had beheaded it."

& # 39; I felt sick. It was great when Blue Planet addressed the topic of garbage in our oceans – we had said it for years. "

Earlier this year, the RSPCA brought back a seal called the "Frisbee" after successfully recovering from life-threatening neck injuries that plunged deep into her throat

Earlier this year, the RSPCA brought back a seal called the "Frisbee" after successfully recovering from life-threatening neck injuries that plunged deep into her throat

Frisbee had got stuck in a tight yellow plastic ring that cut through a few inches of the blubber as it moved

Frisbee had got stuck in a tight yellow plastic ring that cut through a few inches of the blubber as it moved

Earlier this year, the RSPCA returned a seal named "Frisbee" to the sea after successfully recovering from life-threatening neck injuries that hit her neck

Alison Charles, manager of the RSPCA's East Winch Wildlife Center, Norfolk, said Man- delman-made items kill seals daily in the water or on beaches

Alison Charles, manager of the RSPCA's East Winch Wildlife Center, Norfolk, said Man- delman-made items kill seals daily in the water or on beaches

Alison Charles, manager of the RSPCA's East Winch Wildlife Center, Norfolk, said Man- delman-made items kill seals daily in the sea or on beaches

The RSPCA has previously saved and treated two to four seals a year, and none before 2008. However, last year 10 seals were rescued with plastic and metal rings around their necks, as well as plastic ropes and nylons

The RSPCA has previously saved and treated two to four seals a year, and none before 2008. However, last year 10 seals were rescued with plastic and metal rings around their necks, as well as plastic ropes and nylons

The RSPCA has previously saved and treated two to four seals a year, and none before 2008. However, last year 10 seals were rescued with plastic and metal rings around their necks, as well as plastic ropes and nylons

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