Here's why marijuana use increases in older adults, study finds

Here's why marijuana use increases in older adults, study finds

Previous studies have shown that use of marijuana in young adults is increasing, but according to a new report, it is also more commonly used by a group at the other end of the age spectrum.

»RELATED: Georgia Medical Marijuana Expansion Bill signed into law

New York University researchers recently conducted a study published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence to examine the trends in recreational drug use in baby boomers.

To this end, they used data from the 2015-2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which collected responses to marijuana use by more than 17,000 adults aged 50 years and older. The participants were asked when they first used it and whether they used it in the past year.

After analyzing the results, they found 9 percent of adults aged 50-64 and 2.9 percent of adults over 65 years of marijuana. More than half of adults between the ages of 50 and 64 and nearly a quarter of adults aged 65 and over said they had used cannabis at some point in their lives.

"The baby boomer generation grew during a period of significant cultural change, including an increase in the popularity of marijuana in the 1960s and 1970s, and we are now entering a new era of changing attitudes to marijuana, and stigma is declining and As access improves, it seems that baby boomers – many of whom have experience with marijuana smoking – are increasingly using it, "said lead author Benjamin Han Explanation.

Although some of the adults said a doctor recommended taking marijuana, which has proven benefits in treating certain diseases, analysts were worried about the correlation between marijuana and other unhealthy substances.

Those who used marijuana were more likely to abuse alcohol, cocaine and prescription drugs.

"Certain older adults may be at increased risk for adverse effects associated with the use of marijuana, especially if they have certain underlying chronic illnesses or are also dealing with unhealthy substances," Han added.

Researchers suggest that doctors check older adults who use marijuana for other substance to make sure that patients are informed about the potential risks of using multiple medications.

»RELATED: US teen drug use in 2017: Overall, drug use down, marijuana and vaping up, study finds

Leave a comment

Send a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.