Some senators, frustrated by the government's response, refused to support the resolution, arguing that the call for warlike resolution was to be judged regardless of their dissatisfaction with the White House.

"I think that's – from a point of pragmatism – a difference from Mr. Khashoggi and his murder," said Rubio, who will not support the move, on Tuesday.

The House passed the resolution of the warring powers by repealing the veto of President Richard M. Nixon. The resolution arose from the frustration that Congress had eroded during the first decades of the Cold War in deciding when to go to war, when the presidents of both parties began to send troops into battle, including the Korean War, without the permission of the legislator.

Among other things, the resolution of the war powers states that presidents could unilaterally use troops in combat situations only if the United States were attacked, and a mechanism was created for Congress to control the immediate end of a station. The domestic measure states that American military aid to the coalition led by Saudi Arabia must be deemed to be stationed in unauthorized hostilities under the War Powers Act and terminated.

Contrary to many recent disputes over the powers of the president – such as the legal basis for the war of the Obama and Trump governments against the Islamic State – the current debate is not about the extent to which the executive empowers the use of military force in 2001 and 2002 could expand against Al Qaeda and Iraq. The Houthi rebels in Yemen have no connection to these two conflicts.

The Trump administration, however, has said that it can rely on the authority of Congress under other laws, including one that allows the Pentagon to provide logistical support to its allies as a basis for supporting those led by Saudi Arabia Coalition.

The White House also argues that the support that the United States offers – information sharing on goals, logistics support and, until recently, refueling – an operation that lacks the kind of hostility that is covered by the resolution of the warring powers.

The White House has suggested that it could be an unconstitutional interference with Mr. Trump's powers as Commander-in-Chief of the Congress to override his sentence and attempt to end the mission.

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