Hundreds of English and Sri Lankan cricket fans take advantage of the breathtaking ramparts of Galle Fort

Hundreds of English and Sri Lankan cricket fans take advantage of the breathtaking ramparts of Galle Fort

It is certainly among the most picturesque backdrops in Test Match Cricket.

Fort Galle, built in the 1580s by Portuguese settlers and reinforced by the Dutch in the 17th century, proudly stood on Tuesday of the opening of the series between Sri Lanka and England.

The UNESCO-protected granite stone walls have seen many visitors over the centuries, and this time it was the English cricket fans who admired the view from them.

The English captain Joe Root is shot by Rangana Herath from Sri Lanka against the breathtaking backdrop of Fort Galle Fort when the test series between the two nations began on Tuesday

The English captain Joe Root is shot by Rangana Herath from Sri Lanka against the breathtaking backdrop of Fort Galle Fort when the test series between the two nations began on Tuesday

The English captain Joe Root is shot by Rangana Herath from Sri Lanka against the breathtaking backdrop of Fort Galle Fort when the test series between the two nations began on Tuesday

Hundreds of cricket fans lined the ramparts of the 16th-century fortress for a good view of the action on the first day in Galle

Hundreds of cricket fans lined the ramparts of the 16th-century fortress for a good view of the action on the first day in Galle

Hundreds of cricket fans lined the ramparts of the 16th-century fortress for a good view of the action on the first day in Galle

The fortress is located next to the Galle International Stadium and gives viewers an uninterrupted view of the action

The fortress is located next to the Galle International Stadium and gives viewers an uninterrupted view of the action

The fortress is located next to the Galle International Stadium and gives viewers an uninterrupted view of the action

Hundreds of traveling fans – and many locals – were given a free and free look at the opening day of the first test of the fortress walls.

They stand next to the Galle International Stadium, where England, who beat their thugs, dropped for five to 103 before rising to stumps at 306 for eight in the first innings.

The venue Galle from 1876 has long been considered one of the finest in cricket of the highest class. He was flanked on one side by the fortress and two sides of the Indian Ocean.

Galle, a city in the southwestern corner of Sri Lanka, can trace its origins back to the second century AD when it was on the world map of the Greco-Roman geographer Ptolemy.

The picturesque Galle International Stadium is bordered on one side by ramparts and on two sides by the Indian Ocean

The picturesque Galle International Stadium is bordered on one side by ramparts and on two sides by the Indian Ocean

The picturesque Galle International Stadium is bordered on one side by ramparts and on two sides by the Indian Ocean

English and Sri Lankan cricket fans enjoyed the view from the walls of Galle Fort on the opening day of the test

English and Sri Lankan cricket fans enjoyed the view from the walls of Galle Fort on the opening day of the test

English and Sri Lankan cricket fans enjoyed the view from the walls of Galle Fort on the opening day of the test

Hundreds of English fans traveled to Sri Lanka for three games to Galle in Kandy and Colombo

Hundreds of English fans traveled to Sri Lanka for three games to Galle in Kandy and Colombo

Hundreds of English fans traveled to Sri Lanka for three games to Galle in Kandy and Colombo

It was already a busy port at the time, trading with some of the world's greatest powers, including China, Arabia and Greece.

Galle was the place where Portuguese explorers made their first landing in Sri Lanka in 1505, and they were the ones who started building the fort.

The small original fort was called "Santa Cruz" and had a simple design and was made of mud and palm trees. Soon a watchtower and three bastions were added.

The Portuguese moved their center in the late 16th century to Colombo, the current capital of Sri Lanka. However, they had to return when King Raja Singha I attacked their base in Colombo.

The Dutch invaders then joined forces with King Raja Singha II to attack Galle in 1640 and the fortress fell from Portuguese hands.

The 87 unbeaten English batsmen Ben Foakes and Jack Leach run after the start of the series from the field

The 87 unbeaten English batsmen Ben Foakes and Jack Leach run after the start of the series from the field

The 87 unbeaten English batsmen Ben Foakes and Jack Leach run after the start of the series from the field

The fort provides an impressive backdrop for bats being rejected, even though Jos Buttler does not rate this fact correctly

The fort provides an impressive backdrop for bats being rejected, even though Jos Buttler does not rate this fact correctly

The fort provides an impressive backdrop for beating off batsmen, though Jos Buttler did not properly assess this fact

A map showing the proximity of the fort (shaded area) to the Galle International Cricket Stadium in the Sri Lankan city

A map showing the proximity of the fort (shaded area) to the Galle International Cricket Stadium in the Sri Lankan city

A map showing the proximity of the fort (shaded area) to the Galle International Cricket Stadium in the Sri Lankan city

The king, who succeeded in getting rid of the unkempt Portuguese, asked the locals to build the Dutch-style fort as a form of thanks.

The Dutch duly used it as their main location on the island, gradually strengthening it and adding a Protestant church, a weapons house and arsenal, public administration buildings, houses and workshops within the walls.

It remains until the invasion of the British in 1796 on the island. Galle came to them a week after taking Colombo.

The British settled in Colombo, but Galle remained their southern headquarters on the island. Sri Lanka was a British colony from 1815 until independence in 1948.

Since then, it has been recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site because it is a unique exhibition of an urban ensemble that illustrates the interplay between European architecture and South Asian traditions from the 16th to 19th centuries.

And yes, it's a great viewpoint for a day of cricket.

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