I declare the voting minutes in 2016 and the voting minutes in 2018

I declare the voting minutes in 2016 and the voting minutes in 2018

The Author in an Innocent Time Against Election Day 2018 (Abby Ohlheiser / Washington, D.C.)

This is part of an occasional series in which we explain what is behind a popular meme. We like to call it Memplaining. You could call it Meme-ruin. Anyway, if you have just a joke, a tweet, a picture, an app or a GIF that you do not understand, we have the answers – if there are any answers.

Two years after the election in 2016, the mainstream idea that Internet culture is a harmless distraction was devastated. The spread and reach of online disinformation aimed at voters is worse, if any.

Sure, Alex Jones and the hyperpartisan viral sites that target the left and right sides have disappeared from Facebook. But the thing That misinformation remains viral persists: people share things that they deem to be true. And by 2018, a wider segment of the population seems to understand that this impulse can be armed.

Anyway, we are here today to talk about a witty and understandable election protocol.

The meme: I vote against me in 2016, 2018

The meme itself is simple: in addition to a picture that depicts you in an innocent time, a picture that represents the tribute that the last two years have claimed for your body, mind and soul. Maybe you just look distorted and worn in this second image. Maybe you are determined.

Maybe you've turned into Gritty, the mascot of the Philadelphia Flyers that has become a leftist hero, as in the tweet below.

The best way to understand what's going on with this meme is to repeat it. Here are a few other good examples:

If your online world turns blue, you're likely to have a greater chance of finding this meme, as it's being used heavily by those hoping that Tuesday will be a wave of elections.

Where did this meme begin?

The "i-voting" meme is a variation of an older, very popular visual gag. According to Know Your Meme, the "I in ____ Vs. I in _______ "from a viral phenomenon that was in part a more serious attempt to boast of growth over time. A tweet comparing someone from 2006 to 2016 inspired others to make surreal comparisons.

After the format froze, it stayed as a standby on Twitter, if someone wants to make a funny joke about the mental and physical ruin this time brings us all.

Intermediate elections, in particular intermediate elections with fairly high stakes, are one of those times.

Why is this meme happening?

As we explained, when people circulated a viral petition demanding access to the cursed red liquid in a black sarcophagus so they could drink it and stop it all, 2018 was somehow dark. This darkness was also reflected in the meme world: there were jokes about eating Tidehülsen, never enough money for retirement and constant state surveillance.

The i-voting 2016 against me vote 2018 meme is what happens when this darkness meets a touch of optimism. In the weeks leading up to Election Day, Democrats and others who oppose the federal government's republican scrutiny have maintained the need to vote this year. For example, before we looked at the trend of viral rickrolling – getting people to visit a voter registration page with a clickbaity tweet about celebrity gossip. The most viral tweets of the meme "Me Against Me" reflect the cautious, anxious optimism of those hoping for a blue wave – or at least a blue wave.

How can I use this meme like a pro?

Well, first, hurry up. This meme will expire when the polls close, and has already been fairly well circulated.

Think of this as a before and after photo of an infomercial selling some kind of awful wisdom. They were innocent and excited before. Now you know better. Every day has felt like a year, and that burden shows in your tired eyes, eyes that look as if they've experienced a thousand wars.

Or just select two Shrek photos. People like Shrek, I think.

What can I say about this meme during an election nightparty party?

The innocence of the 2016 photo should never have been. What broke on the Internet did that long before these elections. Observers of Facebook's growing influence or the spread of viral misinformation knew this long before the surprising results of the presidential election, which suddenly made "false news" a household term – a term that became another weapon since 2016.

"I choose 2018" is now with us forever. We will never get back the illusion of 2016.

Read more

Is your voting selfie illegal? Could be.

The only way to prevent Facebook from harming us is to hide everything

As a man's viral Instagram testicles went to his "curvy" wife from "reading required" to the mocking meme

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