In Florida, orders are recorded in Senate and Governor meetings

Both Donald Trump and the Republican governor of Florida claimed that state elections threatened to be "stolen" after raiding the Senate and governor elections.

Andrew Gillum, Democratic candidate for the governor's mansion, told reporters: "I am replacing my concessions with an uncompromising and unappealing appeal that we count every single vote."

Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner ordered the unprecedented review of key elections after unofficial results in both races had been outlined by law.

Florida will also be recounting in a third nationwide race. Democrat Nikki Fried had a rapid lead over Republican State Representative Matt Caldwell in the race for the Agriculture Commissioner, one of Florida's three cabinet seats.

During the Senate race, Republican Governor Rick Scott's lead over Democratic Party Bill Nelson is below 0.25%, triggering a recount of ballots from tab machines that could not determine which one to win.

Nelson said his campaign would continue to take action to ensure that every vote is counted without interference or efforts to suppress the democratic process.

"We believe that if every vote is counted, we will win that election," the Senator said in a statement.

Scott urged every state sheriff to watch for violations during Florida's mandatory recount process and take appropriate action.

"We will not allow immoral liberals to steal this election!" He wrote on Twitter, repeating the president who supported him.

Trump card twittered: "I'm trying to STEALEN two major Florida elections! We are watching! "

In the governor's race, the unofficial results show that Ron DeSantis, the former US representative of the Republicans, had led Gillum, the mayor of Tallahassee, with less than 0.5% and demanded a recount of the machine.

DeSantis has said little about the recount and instead pretends to win the election, appointed a transition team and prepared to take office in January. Gillum admitted on Tuesday night, but as the results began to deteriorate, he said every vote should count.

In the Senate race, Rick Scott leads with less than 0.25%.



In the Senate race, Rick Scott leads with less than 0.25%. Photo: Wilfredo Lee / AP

On Saturday, the man trying to become Florida's first African-American governor told reporters that his team had organized a cadre of hundreds of volunteers and lawyers moving through the state fighting against voter oppression and for one ensure fair count.

"This process is not over until every single vote is counted," Gillum said. "The outcome of this election will affect who wins and who loses. How we handle this election in this process will resonate with democracy for a whole generation of voters. "

The development on Saturday brings Florida back to the center of a major political drama. 18 years after a notorious President's report left the White House in control of the White House for more than a month.

In 2000, it took more than five weeks for Florida to declare George W Bush 537 votes in favor of Vice President Al Gore. Bush received the presidency.

Florida was mocked by the way it handled the recount, especially since there was no single process for further action. That changed when the state legislature passed a clear procedure for reporting.

Recent developments underscore the deep gulf in one of the most critical states in US politics. Apart from determining government affairs, it will decide whether Nelson will return to Washington for a fourth term or whether the Republicans will fill their majority in the Senate.

The 67 counties in Florida will decide when to begin the recount. You could start the moment Detzner placed his order, or wait until Sunday or Monday. On Thursday, however, they must be ready by 15 clock. Hand reports will be displayed in the official election results due on 18 November.

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