Italian physicists develop a "thermodynamic equation" to bake the best pizza every time

Italian physicists develop a "thermodynamic equation" to bake the best pizza every time

Scientists have finally cracked the code to make the perfect pizza every time.

During a visit to Italy, physicists Andreas Glatz and Andrey Varlamov asked why pizza tastes best when it comes out of a stone oven.

Since the average person does not have a brick oven in the household, he developed a scientific equation that could achieve the same result.

Scroll down for video

Scientists have finally cracked the code to make the perfect pizza every time. For the study, they used the Margherita pizza, which is considered the first example of modern pizza

Scientists have finally cracked the code to make the perfect pizza every time. For the study, they used the Margherita pizza, which is considered the first example of modern pizza

Scientists have finally cracked the code to make the perfect pizza every time. For the study, they used the Margherita pizza, which is considered the first example of modern pizza

They found that determining the best cooking time in a metal oven is due to the thermodynamics of wood-burning stoves, as evidenced by a mathematical equation

They found that determining the best cooking time in a metal oven is due to the thermodynamics of wood-burning stoves, as evidenced by a mathematical equation

They found that determining the best cooking time in a metal oven is due to the thermodynamics of wood-burning stoves, as evidenced by a mathematical equation

Their results are described in detail in a study entitled "The Physics of Baking Good Pizza," which was published earlier this year in the scientific journal arXiv.

For the study, they used the Margherita pizza, which is considered the first example of modern pizza.

Pizza Margherita dates back to 1889, when Chef Raffaele Esposito was to prepare a dish for Italian Queen Margherita of Savoy. The pizza red tomatoes, white mozzarella and green basil leaves symbolized the colors of the Italian flag.

The researchers found that the physics of conduction, convection and radiation allowed the brick kilns to prepare the perfect cake. These heat mechanisms allow the pizza to burn without burning

The researchers found that the physics of conduction, convection and radiation allowed the brick kilns to prepare the perfect cake. These heat mechanisms allow the pizza to burn without burning

The researchers found that the physics of conduction, convection and radiation allowed the brick kilns to prepare the perfect cake. These heat mechanisms allow the pizza to burn without burning

"This was the first pizza we know and it became famous," said Glatz, a professor and scientist at Northern Illinois University at Argonne National Laboratory, opposite The Midweek News.

Glatz and Varlamov asked the Italian pizza professionals how to cook a Margherita pizza at a temperature where the crust is completely crispy but not burnt.

They were told to cook in a stone oven at 626 degrees Fahrenheit for two minutes.

The researchers decided to investigate the benefits of cooking a pizza in a stone oven versus a conventional oven and "whether there is a way to improve the pizza oven to make a decent pizza".

The temperature profile of pizza in a stone oven with pizza at different times. In the 60s, the surface of the pizza reaches 100 ° C (red circle).

The temperature profile of pizza in a stone oven with pizza at different times. In the 60s, the surface of the pizza reaches 100 ° C (red circle).

The temperature profile of pizza in a stone oven with pizza at different times. In the 60s, the surface of the pizza reaches 100 ° C (red circle).

They discovered that everything is due to the thermodynamics of wood-burning stoves, which is illustrated by a mathematical equation.

In less scientific terms, they found that the physics of ducting, convection and radiation make the perfect cake for brick kilns.

When wood burns in a corner of the stove, this heat radiates out the curved walls and stone floor to evenly cook the pizza.

WHAT IS THE BEST RATIO FOR PIZZA TOPPINGS?

A mathematician claims to have developed the very first formula for the "perfectly proportioned" pizza, taking into account factors such as the ratio of top to bottom.

Dr. Eugenia Cheng said pizza lovers get more bites per bite in a smaller pizza, but a more consistent selection of bites in a larger pizza.

The mathematician from the University of Sheffield calculated a ratio to ensure maximum flavor from base to base.

It turns out that even if a person holds the same amount of dough and topping, the ratio of toppings to toppings in an average bite varies with the size of the pizza, and smaller pizzas usually have more toppings per bite than larger ones.

Dr. Cheng said it's not just how thick the base is, but also the balance of flavors between the toppings and the dough, which determines how much toppings a person can enjoy per bite.

It used d as the constant volume of the dough and t for the constant volume of the serve to obtain a mathematical formula for the ratio of pad to base in a mean bite.

Dr. Cheng calculated that the average bite of an 11-inch pizza is 10 percent more than the average bite of a 14-inch pizza.

The mathematician brought these formulas to mind when asked by the chain restaurant Pizza Express why his 14-inch Romana pizzas, which have a thinner and crisper base than the classic 11-inch pizzas, are so popular.

They developed a thermodynamic equation to calculate what the conditions in a conventional oven must be in order to comply with a brick oven.

They decided that the electric oven would have to be 450 degrees Fahrenheit while the pizza was cooking for 170 seconds.

And for veggie lovers, the scientists recommend to extend the cooking time to compensate for pizzas with water-rich coverings.

Leave a comment

Send a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.