It's time change. Did you think about falling back?

It's time change. Did you think about falling back?

It's the first weekend in November, which means it was time to "fall back" this morning.

For most Americans, at 2:00 pm on Sunday, it was again everything at 1am, providing an extra hour to sleep, celebrate, or perhaps go through this sampling before voting on Tuesday in between.

The change affects everyone in the United States, except for people in Hawaii and parts of Arizona who do not notice summer time. The areas of Guam, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands and American Samoa also do not accept the change. (Florida legislators voted earlier this year to end the time change, but they still need to be accepted by Congress before it takes effect there.)

What it does

For those who have changed the numbers on their watch, the sun seems to get up earlier in the morning and go down earlier at night.

Now there is much discussion about whether this twice-yearly time change is worthwhile. There are studies that suggest that changing the clock by one hour in the spring to start summertime increases the risk of strokes and heart attacks.
Summertime Fast facts
However, most of us do not really care about summer time, according to a survey by Princeton Survey Research.

And there are some nice things about switching to standard time in the fall, which goes beyond the extra hour. If we did not reset our watches, the sunrise would not be until 8:30 in many places. When we fall back to normal time, the sunrise time is a bit closer to what we are used to.

How it started

The idea for the time change came from legendary American inventor, statesman and founding father Ben Franklin, who in a letter to a French magazine in 1784 suggested that Parisians could save thousands of francs a year by waking earlier in the summer so they would not I would have to buy so many candles to light the evening hours.

The United States did not adopt this practice until the 20th century – for a brief period during the First World War, during World War II, and in the years after the war on a state basis. It became a national politics with some gadgets that began in 1966. Dozens of other countries now also observe some form of summer time.

Of course, the extra hour only lasts for so long. Those who received it must return it on March 10, if they "jump forward" and turn the clock for an hour.

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