Latest New Mexico news, sports, business and entertainment at 3:20 pm MDT

  • RÍO SECO NEW MEXICO-PECOS

ALBUQUERQUE, NM (AP) – Federal water managers say New Mexico’s Pecos River basin is likely to experience increasing water shortages as temperatures continue to rise over the next century. The US Reclamation Office on Wednesday discussed the findings of a recently completed study on the basin. The Pecos River flows through eastern New Mexico into Texas, where it joins the Rio Grande near the US-Mexico border. It is home to more than 130,000 acres of crops and orchards. The study aimed to gain a better understanding of the threats to the watershed’s water supply due to climate change. Officials also looked at what tools could be used to stretch resources.

SANTA FE, NM (AP) – New Mexico state officials are sending $ 157 million to about 1,000 child care providers. The money can be used to pay for rent, utilities, and labor costs. Governor Michell Lujan Grisham said Wednesday that a strong child care industry is needed to support parents in the workforce. It is the latest investment in child care made possible by federal pandemic relief funds. The New Mexico Department of Early Childhood Care and Education has also used federal money to make more families eligible for child care subsidies. Eligibility now includes families of four with incomes up to $ 93,000.

SANTA FE, NM (AP) – Lawmakers are drafting a plan to ease restrictions on retired police officers returning to work in an effort to add more officers across New Mexico amid a labor shortage. In a legislative hearing Tuesday, retired police officer and state Representative Bill Rehm of Albuquerque outlined a proposed changes to the reemployment provisions for retired police officers to incentivize return to work. He said agents could continue to draw on pension benefits or expect a higher payment later. The governor of New Mexico wants to deploy 1,000 more police officers amid public frustration with the crime.

SANTA FE, NM (AP) – Nearly 13,000 absentee and early votes have been cast in the local elections that will determine the next mayors of New Mexico’s largest city, as well as the state capital, with two weeks to go on May Day. the elections. The secretary of state’s office released its first count of voter turnout in the November 2 consolidated elections Tuesday for local government offices, including school boards and bond initiatives that influence local tax rates. . More than 25,000 absentee ballots have been requested. Mayors Tim Keller in Albuquerque and Alan Webber in Santa Fe are running for reelection in three-way races.

NEW YORK (AP) – One of the most innovative and acclaimed literary magazines in the country is closing. The Believer was founded almost 20 years ago. It has been part of the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas since 2017. The final issue of the bi-monthly publication, No. 139, is scheduled for February / March 2022. The school considers the decision to be part of a realignment strategy shaped by the coronavirus pandemic. The Believer was founded in 2003 by authors Vendela Vida, Ed Park, and Heidi Julavits. In his words, he was betting on journalism, essays that are usually very long and book reviews that are not necessarily timely.

  • AIR FORCE POLLUTION-ALBUQUERQUE

CLOVIS, NM (AP) – New Mexico environmental protection officials have completed testing of nearly five dozen private wells near a US Air Force base in eastern New Mexico for so-called “permanent chemicals” known as PFAS. Chemicals can be toxic to humans and animals. The state Department of the Environment said Monday that neither of the two PFAS contaminants for which the US Environmental Protection Agency has issued health warnings were detected in samples collected during the study. However, other types of PFAS compounds were found at very low levels in some wells. Chemical contamination has been documented in and around Cannon and Holloman Air Force Bases, leading to a legal fight with the Air Force.

  • VIRUS OUTBREAK-NAVAJO NATION

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. (AP) – The Navajo Nation reported 85 more COVID-19 cases Tuesday, but no more deaths for the fourteenth time in the past 20 days. The latest figures brought the tribe’s totals to 34,999 confirmed cases of COVID-19 from the virus since the pandemic began more than a year ago. The known death toll remains at 1,464. Tribal officials still urge people to get vaccinated, wear masks when in public, and minimize their travels. Based on cases from October 1-14, the Navajo Health Department issued an advisory for 31 communities due to the uncontrolled spread of the coronavirus. The tribe’s reservation is the largest in the country at 27,000 square miles and covers parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah.

  • AMAZON-CARGO FACILITY-ALBUQUERQUE

ALBUQUERQUE, NM (AP) – Amazon is considering the airport in New Mexico’s most populous city as the site for the construction of a new cargo facility. Members of the Albuquerque City Council formally proposed a leasing agreement Monday for Seattle-based Amazon to build a 30,750-square-foot cargo facility at the Albuquerque International Sunport. Amazon spokeswoman Eileen Hards declined to comment beyond a prepared statement that said the company has not yet signed a lease for the site, but is “actively exploring options locally.” Albuquerque officials said the airport’s existing cargo operations are at full capacity. The city recently won a $ 6.5 million federal grant to expand the airport’s cargo bay.

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