Lindsey Vonn: Almost every part of the body hurts

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<pre>Lindsey Vonn: Almost every part of the body hurts

  • Ski racer Lindsey Vonn has won 82 World Cup races in her career so far.
  • Now the 33-year-old has announced her resignation, but before she wants to outdo Ingemar Stenmark, who has four wins more than the American.

One of the most frequently asked questions of recent years was the question of her injuries. Lindsey Vonn can now recite her like a poem learned by heart: Two cruciate ligament surgeries, two fractures of the tibia, a fracture of the upper arm, a meniscal and tendineal tear, a broken ankle, a fracture Wrist, one in each thumb and little finger. Oh, and a few pinched back fascias. If you wanted to know how it is about Vonn, it was easier in the end to ask for their intact body parts. "Left hand and left arm," she said, they were still fine.

Lindsey Vonn, 33, of Saint Paul, Minnesota, has long been the most successful ski racer in history, the bare numbers speak for her: four overall World Cup victories, two world titles, Olympic gold and bronze on the descent, and then, of course, those 82 World Cup victories, twenty more than the second best woman ever managed, the Austrian Annemarie Moser-Pröll. Vonn still misses four victories over the unreal success of Sweden's Ingemar Stenmark – not much, but not least, after all the injuries.

Speed ​​queen with a penchant for diva

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The American had designed a simple timetable last spring; she'll ride until she conquers Stenmark's best, she said – or until her body surrenders. Now the latter is starting. "Physically, I'm at a point where it makes no sense anymore," Vonn said on Thursday in New York: "I'd like to stay active when I'm older." The coming season will be her last, whether she reaches Stenmark's record or not. "And if not, I still had an incredibly successful career."

Vonn will not just stop, she will make her last season, which will start in Sölden in two weeks, as a farewell tour. Everything else would have surprised, Vonn has never spared the attention; sometimes you had the feeling that all the cameras were built just for you. Before the winter games in South Korea Vonn had looked again at this eventful career in the SZ-conversation, at her childhood, when her father relocated the family to ski mecca Vail ("A big break, especially for my four brothers and sisters"). , She talked about her ambition ("A way to repay the investments that my family put into me"), about the injuries she gets from her depression ("Skiing gives me pleasure, that's one reason why I do it I still do not know what I will replace it with if I stop ").

Olympic athletes have to divulge much of themselves in the US to attract attention, on the other hand, she is "an open person," said Vonn, "this has nothing to do with acting". In the end it was like this: where she appeared was a spectacle, even if she was just there. In it, the Olympic sport also loses one of its few over-figures.

But first there is another season ahead of her, with the World Championships in Are. And then? Maybe a career as a businesswoman. She wants to be more successful than her sport, said Vonn in New York. Heavy goals have never deterred them.

"I want to do things that nobody has done yet"

Skier Lindsey Vonn on goals, strong women, why she would have ended her career without injury and how she copes with her depression.

Interview by Johannes Knuth

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