Living near a noisy street or airport increases the risk of heart attack and stroke more than three times

Living near a noisy street or airport increases the risk of heart attack and stroke more than three times

Living near a noisy street or airport triples your risk of heart attack or stroke.

The scientists warned that the opportunities also exist for non-smokers and for people who do not have diabetes, who already have an increased risk.

According to Massachusetts General Hospital experts, exposure to environmental noise is a brain region involved in stress responses.

This then promotes the inflammation of the blood vessels, which can lead to cardiovascular problems such as heart attacks and strokes.

People who have been exposed to chronic noise, such as Near an airport, showed more inflammation in their arteries and more than three times the risk of having a heart attack or stroke and other serious cardiovascular events

People who have been exposed to chronic noise, such as Near an airport, showed more inflammation in their arteries and more than three times the risk of having a heart attack or stroke and other serious cardiovascular events

People who have been exposed to chronic noise, such as Near an airport, showed more inflammation in their arteries and more than three times the risk of having a heart attack or stroke and other serious cardiovascular events

The Dr. Azar Radfar quoted researchers used 499 subjects for the study. The participants had an average age of 56 years in the study.

The results were on the The Scientific Sessions Conference of the American Heart Association today in Chicago.

None of the participants had cardiovascular disease or cancer. They all underwent simultaneous PET and CT scans of their brain and blood vessels.

With these images, the scientists evaluated the activity of the amygdala – an area of ​​the brain involved in stress regulation and emotional responses.

To measure the noise exposure, the researchers used the participants' home addresses and derived the estimated noise levels from the Department of Transportation's aviation and highway noise map.

To assess the cardiovascular risk, the researchers examined the medical records of the participants after the first imaging studies.

Of the 499 participants, 40 experienced a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack or stroke in the five years following the first test.

People with the highest levels of noise had higher levels of amygdala activity and more inflammation in their arteries.

Their risk of having a heart attack or stroke was more than three times higher than that of people with lower noise levels.

This risk remained high, even after researchers considered other risk factors such as air pollution, high cholesterol, smoking and diabetes.

Further analysis has revealed that high levels of amygdalar activity apparently clear a pathway that increases cardiac risk by inducing blood vessel inflammation, a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

"A growing body of research reveals a connection between ambient noise and cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Radfar.

"But the physiological mechanisms behind it are unclear.

"We believe that our findings provide an important insight into the biology behind this phenomenon."

The results of the study provide much needed insights into the biological mechanisms of the well-known, but poorly understood, interaction between cardiovascular disease and chronic noise pollution.

They point out that further research is needed to determine if reducing noise exposure can significantly reduce cardiovascular risk and reduce the number of cardiovascular events across the population.

In the meantime, however, the new findings should prompt physicians to consider chronic exposure to ambient noise as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

"Patients and their physicians should consider chronic noise exposure when assessing cardiovascular risk, and may wish to take action to minimize or reduce this chronic burden," said Drs. Radfar.

Last month, noise pollution from traffic noise has been associated with a higher risk of depression. The researchers warned that a regular exposure of more than 65 decibels, which is quieter than a truck, can increase the personal risk by two-thirds.

HOW DAMAGE PROTECTION HEALTH BECOMES

Noise can not only cause trouble, but also disturb sleep, damage hearing and seriously endanger people's health.

The World Health Organization recommends a guideline level of 30 dB LAeq for undisturbed sleep and a 50 dB outdoor noise level daily to prevent people becoming "moderately annoyed".

The physiological effects of noise exposure include contracting blood vessels, tensing up muscles, increasing heart rate and blood pressure, and altering abdominal and abdominal movement.

A number of reports have established direct links between traffic noise and the health of the heart:

  • A 2015 study by Barts and the London School of Medicine found that people surrounded by daytime traffic noise louder than 60 dB had a 4 percent greater chance of dying than people with noise levels 55 dB was.
  • In the first study of this kind, researchers in Denmark found in 2011 that the risk of a stroke of ten decibels each increased by 14 percent. For the over-65s, the risk increased by 27 percent.
  • A study published this year, which surveyed thousands of people living in Amsterdam for a four-year period, found that traffic noise above 70 decibels (db) had a 65% higher risk of depression.

The World Health Organization has calculated that every year in Western European countries at least 1 million healthy years of life are lost due to environmental noise.

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