Maaßen should be dismissed

Maaßen should be dismissed

  • The outgoing constitutional protection chief Maassen may not change to the Federal Ministry of the Interior.
  • Maassens criticism again in the report of the German media about the riots in Chemnitz, which he said to European counterparts.
  • Unlike before, for the first time the Federal Ministry of the Interior seems to move away from it publicly.

From Constanze von Bullion and Ronen Steinke, Berlin

Since his dismissal as head of the German domestic secret service five weeks ago, Hans-Georg Maaßen has shown little insight into his own mistakes. Now he has apparently again refilled with his criticism of the reporting of German media about right-wing extremist riots in Chemnitz in early September, which had ultimately led to his dismissal. This time, Maaßen is said to have spoken to European counterparts. And unlike so far, the Federal Ministry of the Interior seems to be moving away from Maaßen for the first time.

On Sunday evening, a spokesman for the ministry said that Maaß's new statements were "currently being examined". "After the exam, the Minister will draw the consequences," said the spokesman. He confirmed a report by the German Press Agency. In the Ministry of the Interior, which is headed by Horst Seehofer (CSU), they had always held to dimensions. Seehofer had originally wanted to keep him as president of the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution. If the allegations are confirmed, Maaßen may not change to the Federal Ministry of the Interior.

A manuscript with a farewell

The background, according to information from security circles, is a speech that Maaßen held at the end of October as part of what is known as the Bern Club, a round of 30 heads of European domestic intelligence services, who meet twice a year for a free exchange. The manuscript of his speech should then have put Maaßen on the intranet of the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution, provided with a farewell to the staff of the house, which he should leave soon to change to the Federal Ministry of the Interior.

The manuscript is said to contain several pointed remarks that relate, inter alia, but not only, to the incidents in Chemnitz. There it was after the killing of a man in early September for days, partly open racist riots came. Maaßen had been in the imageNewspaper with comments that critics had interpreted as appeasement and small talk of violence in Chemnitz. Among other things, he had raised doubts about the authenticity of a video that is supposed to show a violent scene.

At first Seehofer wanted to promote Maassen to Secretary of State

The case turned into a crisis for the grand coalition after Maassen had provoked outrage with his statements, but did not want to take anything back from them. The SPD had urged him to relieve him. Interior Minister Seehofer had enforced that Maassen can still continue his career as a civil servant. At first Seehofer wanted to promote him to the secretary of state in his ministry. Following public outrage, Maassen was to receive only a lower-ranked ministry post, the position of a special adviser on European and international affairs, with the rank of department head.

Whether the criticism that Maaßen has now expressed in the Berne club, was also explicitly directed against parts of the Federal Government, remained open on Sunday. Among other things, it should be examined whether Maaßen actually chose the words in his manuscript – whether he actually renewed his controversial statements personally to his European colleagues or "only" in writing to all employees of the Federal Office.

Some employees in the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution are said to have gained the impression in recent weeks that Maaßen, with his very open remarks, had taken the risk of losing his eyesight.

Thomas Haldenwang should replace Maaßen

The previous Vice President of the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution should be according to media reports new president of the authority and successor to Hans-Georg Maassen.

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