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Majority of Germans fear expansion to other countries

Many Germans fear that if weapons continue to be delivered, the Ukraine war could turn into a conflagration. That shows a new poll. Scholz’s reticence, on the other hand, is well received.

The majority of Germans fear that the war in Ukraine will spread to other countries if weapons continue to be supplied. In the RTL/ntv “trend barometer” published on Tuesday, 56 percent of those surveyed expressed this fear, 39 percent did not share it. Only a minority, 26 percent, believed that the war could be won militarily; 63 percent see an end to the war ultimately only achievable through negotiations and a diplomatic solution.

The majority of those surveyed believe that Chancellor Olaf Scholz (SPD)’s line in the Ukraine crisis is correct – regardless of the demands from the Union, but also from the governing coalition for more decisive action and more arms deliveries. 65 percent think the chancellor’s course, which is more in favor of a cautious approach coordinated with NATO, is good; 26 percent are in favor of a tougher approach.

Union and SPD are neck and neck

According to the trend barometer, however, the SPD lost some of its electorate’s trust this week. The Social Democrats lost one percentage point compared to the previous week and are only 24 percent. The result: Since the CDU/CSU remained at 25 percent compared to the previous week, the Union has overtaken the SPD.

If there were a federal election on Sunday, the other parties could expect the following result: The Greens would get 20 percent, the FDP nine percent, the AfD nine percent and the left four percent.

Scholz also loses easily

Just like his party, Chancellor Olaf Scholz has lost one percentage point. He comes to 42 percent, but is still well ahead of CDU leader Friedrich Merz. 18 percent would still choose the 66-year-old in a federal election.

From April 22 to 25, the Forsa Institute surveyed a total of 1,007 German citizens. The statistical margin of error was given as three percentage points.

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