Matt Hancock accused of seeking a "nanny state"

Matt Hancock accused of seeking a "nanny state"

The Minister of Health and Welfare was accused of having "Nannying" for his plans to get people to take control of their own health.

Matt Hancock announced plans to help people make healthier decisions to reduce the number of patients who become hospitalized in a speech today.

He said smokers should get extra help to stop people being told to eat healthily and be encouraged to do sports.

Hancock also suggested that employers should play a bigger role in keeping their workers healthy, and health workers should do more at the bedside.

But his plans have come under fire. People criticize the "nanny state" for telling them what to do and for accusing people who are living a healthy lifestyle.

Undersecretary for Health and Welfare, Matt Hancock was accused of being asked to carry out further bedside interventions to give people health advice during hospitalization because of his calls to the NHS

Undersecretary for Health and Welfare, Matt Hancock was accused of being asked to carry out further bedside interventions to give people health advice during hospitalization because of his calls to the NHS

State Secretary for Health and Welfare, Matt Hancock, has been accused of "Nannying" because of his calls to the NHS to carry out further bedside interventions to give people health advice during hospitalization

In a paper titled "Prevention is better than cure," the Ministry of Health and Welfare has set plans for personalized health plans.

The NHS needs more intervention, Hancock said. He refers to people who need them most, the so-called preventive prevention.

For example, smokers who are hospitalized could automatically be given help to quit before being forwarded after leaving the phone.

This is a model used in Ottawa, Canada. There, patients are expected to be in hospital half as often within a month, and nearly twice as likely to be alive in two years.

Hancock said in a speech today: "I want to see bedside interventions in our hospitals so that patients who smoke patients, medication, behavioral support and follow-up are offered when they go home.

"And we have to fulfill our commitments to the obesity strategy and set ambitious goals for salt as well."

However, critics say that the plans go too far and were previously tried without success.

GOVERNMENT REQUESTS NHS AGENCY STAFF

The Minister of Health and Welfare has promised to reduce spending on agencies in the NHS and said the use of temporary workers could be "demoralizing" for workers.

Matt Hancock said last month that a lot of work had been done to reduce the use of agency workers, but added that he would go further and say, "Boy, there will be much more".

Hancock said NHS 'own banking system, where workers are on the payroll and doing casual shifts, works well and offers better value for money.

It was unfair for the nurses to work together with temporary workers who would do the same or less work but would be paid more, the West Suffolk MP added.

The latest figures from NHS Improvement show that agency spending in England in 2017/18 was £ 2.4 billion.

This figure dropped from £ 3.6 billion in 2015/16 when it introduced a ceiling on the cost of private agency workers.

TalkRadio columnist and presenter Julia Hartley-Brewer said in an interview with the Minister of Health, "Everyone knows you do not have to live with a kebab and cigarettes every day, but millions of people are obviously doing it.

"In your opinion, why is this integrity message getting through if these other integrity messages do not?"

Mr Hancock also said that employers should give their workers free fruit, lend them bicycles and provide advice to keep people healthy enough to work.

Yesterday in the BBC's Andrew Marr Show, Ms. Hartley-Brewer said, "I'm not entirely sure that my boss's job is to make sure I'm fit and healthy enough, mentally or physically, to get to work go.

"It's about personal responsibility. If you want to be healthy, be healthy. If you are not healthy and can not work then it is difficult. "

The people on Twitter also had excavations in Mr Hancock's strategy.

Matt Kilcoyne said, "Reduce the child's utterances, enforced calorie expenditure, bans and taxes, and take responsibility for your department."

A man named David Hardman added: "Taking responsibility for health (or life with the consequences of ill health) when being rich is fairly easy.

The people on Twitter also had excavations in Mr Hancock's strategy. Matt Kilcoyne said, "Reduce the child girl's pronouncements, enforced calorie counts, bans and taxes, and take responsibility for your department."

The people on Twitter also had excavations in Mr Hancock's strategy. Matt Kilcoyne said, "Reduce the child girl's pronouncements, enforced calorie counts, bans and taxes, and take responsibility for your department."

The people on Twitter also had excavations in Mr Hancock's strategy. Matt Kilcoyne said, "Reduce the nanny state's statements, the number of forced calories, bans and taxes, and take responsibility for your department."

Jim Gallagher said prevention was not as effective as experts would like and tweeted: & # 39; Hancock talked about preventing public health problems

Jim Gallagher said prevention was not as effective as experts would like and tweeted: & # 39; Hancock talked about preventing public health problems

Jim Gallagher said prevention is not as effective as experts would like, and tweeted, "Hancock talked about public health problems

Siema Iqbal said, "Maybe you make junk food, cheap liquor and cigs less affordable and available"

Siema Iqbal said, "Maybe you make junk food, cheap liquor and cigs less affordable and available"

Siema Iqbal said, "Maybe you make junk food, cheap liquor and cigs less affordable and available"

A man named David Hardman added, "Taking responsibility for health (or life with the consequences of ill health) when being rich is pretty easy."

A man named David Hardman added, "Taking responsibility for health (or life with the consequences of ill health) when being rich is pretty easy."

A man named David Hardman added, "Taking responsibility for health (or life with the consequences of ill health) when being rich is pretty easy."

Twitter usage & # 39; Kulgan of Crydee & # 39; Tweeted that they thought, & # 39; work was the Nannying state & # 39;

Twitter usage & # 39; Kulgan of Crydee & # 39; Tweeted that they thought, & # 39; work was the Nannying state & # 39;

The use of "Kulgan of Crydee" by Twitter has tweeted that they thought "Labor the Nannying State"

"If you can not afford luxury extras such as gym membership, personal trainer, etc., this is more of a challenge. Living in the real world, Mr. Hancock. "

Mr. Hancock said in his speech this morning that the 6.6 percent increase in A & E registrations last year was "unsustainable".

He added, "Only with better prevention can our NHS be sustainable in the long term," and he called for more interventions to give people a compelling health advice.

Siema Iqbal, a general practitioner, tweeted: "Maybe you make junk food, cheap liquor and cigs less affordable and available.

Possibly fruit and vegetables, make access to gyms, health education and mental health services cheaper and more available? "

Jim Gallagher said prevention is not as effective as experts would like and tweeted, "Hancock talked about preventing public health problems.

"I've heard all this nanny state crap before and it never works, you can not make adults do something they do not want to do.

"Many poor people can not afford healthy food for the cheapest."

Details on how the government's personalized health plans work have not yet been published.

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