Maybe soccer players will not fake it! Recurring injuries have doubled in the last two decades

Maybe soccer players will not fake it! Recurring injuries have doubled in the last two decades

Many footballers get a bad name when they overthrow and scream at the slightest knock.

However, they may not fake the pain if they believe that new scientific research based on professional footballers in England is believed.

Modern players in the English leagues suffer twice as many injuries as their predecessors in the late '90s.

Experts also noted that the injury rate has risen by 50 percent, due to the fact that they have to play more games and work harder in the games.

Cristiano Ronaldo (pictured playing for Portugal in 2016) is infamous for his dramatic reactions when attacked or injured

Cristiano Ronaldo (pictured playing for Portugal in 2016) is infamous for his dramatic reactions when attacked or injured

Cristiano Ronaldo (pictured playing for Portugal in 2016) is notorious for his dramatic response to an attack or injury to his body

Experts say that the number of injuries English football players have suffered has increased since the late 1990s. This could be because they have to play more often or work harder (Picture: Harry Kane of Tottenham Hotspur holds his leg in a match against West Ham)

Experts say that the number of injuries English football players have suffered has increased since the late 1990s. This could be because they have to play more often or work harder (Picture: Harry Kane of Tottenham Hotspur holds his leg in a match against West Ham)

Experts say that the number of injuries English football players have suffered has increased since the late 1990s. This could be because they have to play more often or work harder (Picture: Harry Kane of Tottenham Hotspur holds his leg in a match against West Ham)

Leeds Beckett University researchers investigated the injury rates of 243 EFL and National League players in the 2015/16 season.

The English Football League (EFL) includes Premier League teams as well as the Championship, League One and League Two teams.

Players of the study, published in the journal Physical Therapy in Sport, were selected from 10 unknown teams.

In a previous study of players between 1997 and 1999, players had an average of 1.3 injuries per player per season.

However, this number has increased by half over the next 15 years to reach 1.9 in the 2016 season, according to the study cited by Ashley Jones.

And recurrent injuries – defined as those that are the same type of injury that returns after healing someone else in the same place – have also increased.

They accounted for more than one in six injuries (17 percent), compared with only one in 14 (seven percent) in the 2001 study.

This suggests that fewer players suffer a higher proportion of injuries by injuring themselves several times during the season.

Players in the UK suffer an average of 1.9 injuries per player per season, as research shows, a rise of 1.3 per player in 2001 (Photo: Paul Pogba of Manchester United, who joined in a game against Chelsea last month) the shoulder held).

Players in the UK suffer an average of 1.9 injuries per player per season, as research shows, a rise of 1.3 per player in 2001 (Photo: Paul Pogba of Manchester United, who joined in a game against Chelsea last month) the shoulder held).

Players in the UK suffer an average of 1.9 injuries per player per season, as research shows, a rise of 1.3 per player in 2001 (pictured: Paul Pogba of Manchester United, who joined in a game against Chelsea last month held on the shoulder).

"This change in the last 16 years could also be due to the greater number of requirements in all English football leagues," write the authors in the study.

"Cup competitions with an increased number of rounds for football league teams add extra traffic."

They said that studying teams outside the Premier League could also increase the injury rate as the EFL teams play 48 games per season, compared to 38.

And another recent study indicated that top-flight football fans need to make more and more efforts to be the best.

Between the seasons 2006 and 2012, the time spent by the players with intense activity increased by 30 percent.

Modern players sprint 35 percent and 85 percent more often, according to the same study by the University of Sunderland.

The thigh is the most common site for injuries, accounting for nearly one-third (31.7 percent), followed by the knee (14.6 percent) and the ankle (13 percent).

Four out of ten injuries are due to muscle tension, followed by muscle sprain (17 percent) and blunt soft tissue injuries (13.7 percent).

Injuries are most often considered moderate, with healing lasting between eight and 28 days.

According to the researchers, the thigh is the most common place where injuries occur, followed by knees and ankles; Injuries of the lower extremities make up the vast majority

According to the researchers, the thigh is the most common place where injuries occur, followed by knees and ankles; Injuries of the lower extremities make up the vast majority

According to the researchers, the thigh is the most common site of injury, followed by knees and ankles – lower extremity injuries make up the vast majority

PREMIER LEAGUE MUST COMBAT MORE TO FIGHT THE PROBLEM GAMBLING

The Premier League needs to do more to support the bill caused by problem gambling, warned the head of the NHS in September.

Simon Stevens described gambling as one of the "new threats" to the health of the nation and the burden on mental health care.

Nearly half – nine out of 20 Premier League teams – and 17 out of 24 (70 percent) teams in the championship are now sponsored by gambling companies.

The Chief Executive of NHS England said it was "deeply worried" that foreign betting companies with shirt sponsorship deals "are not doing their part" in funding addiction services.

The Gambling Commission's figures show that there are 430,000 people in the UK with gambling addiction, including 25,000 children under the age of 16.

He urged Premier League clubs involved in lucrative deals with gambling companies to urge them to raise the necessary funds to relieve pressure on the NHS.

Mr. Stevens said, "There is an increasing connection between problem gambling and stress, depression and other mental health problems.

Doctors report that two-thirds of trouble-free players deteriorate without help, and the NHS offers special treatment.

"Reports that foreign gambling companies are not playing their part in co-financing addicts are deeply worrying.

"Taxpayers and the NHS should not pick up the parts. The health of the nation is the responsibility of all. "

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