A chiropractor who was filmed hanging a two-week-old baby upside down to crack his back will no longer be treating children

  • The Melbourne chiropractor faced back pain in treating the newborn baby
  • Dr. Andrew Arnold saw a two-week-old baby hanging upside down on his legs
  • He continued to tap the baby on the head and press the skull with both hands
  • The authorities have opened an investigation against Dr. Arnold and his practice initiated
  • Chiropractor has agreed not to treat children under the age of 12 during the examination
  • The video of the consultation has sparked debates about the effectiveness of techniques

Kylie Stevens

and
Aidan Wondracz for Daily Mail Australia

A chiropractor in the middle of a controversy over the manipulation of spinal cords in childhood, which has provoked public outrage, can no longer treat children while the authorities are investigating.

Dr. Andrew Arnold, the Melbourne chiropractor, who was filmed hanging a newborn on the head to tear his back and agreed not to treat anyone under the age of 12 after appearing before the Chiropractic Board of Australia on Thursday.

"I will not undertake chiropractic care for children from birth to the age of 12," states a company published on the website of the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency.

"I will not post, display, promote or provide materials, information or advice related to the assessment, treatment or treatment of children from birth to 12 years of age, including but not limited to the publication of material in social media, blogs and / or another platform on the Internet. "

Victorian Health Minister Jenny Mikakos has confirmed to reporters dr. Arnold will be examined on Thursday by AHPRA and the Chiropractic Board of Australia.

"They are investigating this matter and I have actually invited them to a meeting and I will be meeting with the Chairman of the Chiropractic Board of Australia next week as well as the CEO of AHPRA," she said.

"I am concerned about this particular case, but I also want to make sure that there are no other chiropractors in Australia who do this kind of practice in a similar way.

It is very important that the [board] gives all chiropractors in Australia very clear advice on the risks associated with these practices. & # 39;

Dr. Arnold performed a spinal treatment on a two-week-old baby The session was filmed and later posted on the Cranbourne Family Chiropractic Facebook pagewhich has since been shut down.

The footage shows that the chiropractor is performing a series of controversial tests on the baby, which Victorian Health Minister Jenny Mikakos later described as "extremely disturbing."

Dr. Arnold starts folding the baby's legs on his hips until he feels a click while the newborn's parents are standing in front of the camera.

A chiropractor has come under fire for his treatment of a two-week-old baby, after dangling the newborn baby upside down during a consultation

A chiropractor has come under fire for his treatment of a two-week-old baby, after dangling the newborn baby upside down during a consultation

A chiropractor has come under fire for his treatment of a two-week-old baby, after dangling the newborn baby upside down during a consultation

He finally pulls out a device called Activator, a spring-loaded chiropractic device

He finally pulls out a device called Activator, a spring-loaded chiropractic device

He finally pulls out a device called Activator, a spring-loaded chiropractic device

He finally pulls out a device called activator, a spring-loaded chiropractic.

He tests the device on an adult's hand to get an idea of ​​the power of the tool.

"We'll use the activator for the lower setting, and I'll just show you on your hand here," Dr. Arnold to the person who is not in the camera.

Then he puts the activator on the newborn.

Within seconds of activation, the baby bursts into tears. But Dr. Arnold does not stop there.

He rolls the baby on his back to test the collarbone. With two fingers on the crying baby's collarbone, he taps his free hand against the head of the disturbed baby.

A series of tests later examines Dr. Arnold the bones in the baby's head.

This time he presses with both hands on the child's head, the child visibly desperate.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Cranbourne Family Chiropractic for comment.

The president of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, Harry Nespolon, has called on the government and the authorities to ban the practice.

"The concept of manipulating a baby's back is terrible," he told AAP.

"The government needs to check this very carefully and decide if it thinks it's okay to do it on a baby."

A series of tests later examines Dr. Arnold the bones in the baby's head

A series of tests later examines Dr. Arnold the bones in the baby's head

A series of tests later examines Dr. Arnold the bones in the baby's head

This time he presses with both hands on the child's head, the child visibly desperate

This time he presses with both hands on the child's head, the child visibly desperate

This time he presses with both hands on the child's head, the child visibly desperate

The president of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, Harry Nespolon, has called on the government and the authorities to ban the practice

The president of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, Harry Nespolon, has called on the government and the authorities to ban the practice

The president of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, Harry Nespolon, has called on the government and the authorities to ban the practice

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