Midterm results: Ilhan Omar, Jared Polis ... elections marked by great firsts

Midterm results: Ilhan Omar, Jared Polis ... elections marked by great firsts

INTERNATIONAL – Several candidates promised to go down in history, and some of them did. On the occasion of the 2018 midterms, the mid-term elections in the United States, several barriers leapt into a country where minority-related tensions were exacerbated by the election of Donald Trump.

If the "blue wave" the Democrats dreamed of to counter the US president's policy proved much more timid than hoped, several faces emerged on the ballot, giving America a more open and soothed that what the excesses of Trump or his supporters show.

From the first Native American to access Congress to the first openly gay governor, find out below the list of those candidates who have jumped the barriers in the United States.

Jared Polis, the first openly gay governor of the United States

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jared Polis greets the crowd before an intervention by Bernie Sanders at the University of Colorado on October 24th.

Politics, Jared Polis has known her for twenty years now. Yet he crossed a historic course on November 6, becoming the first openly gay governor of the United States. Already elected Colorado House of Representatives, the Democrat has defeated Republican opponent Walker Stapleton.

Entrepreneur and philanthropist, committed to education and support to veterans, millionaire Jared Polis is the third richest member of Congress, according to Forbes. He had spent $ 20 million of his own fortune on his campaign – $ 7 million more than his opponent, according to NBC. As a couple and father of two, Jared Polis becomes the 2nd LGBT governor after Kate Brown, bisexual governor of Oregon.

Ilhan Omar, first Muslim and African refugee in Congress

Brian Snyder / Reuters

Ilhan Omar at his Minneapolis campaign headquarters in Minnesota on October 26th.

Ilhan Omar tells a story of ascent can not be more current. Born in Mogadishu, Somalia, settled in a refugee camp in Kenya at the age of eight to escape the civil war, she arrived in the United States with her parents at the age of 12. After studying economics, political science and international relations, she was elected to the House of Representatives of Minnesota in 2016, at age 33, where she gained notoriety. Winning the game against Republican Jennifer Zielinski, she became the first American-Somali woman in the US Congress.

"I am America's hope and the president's nightmare," she summed up humorously on Trevor Noah's set. Elected to the House of Representatives, this mother of three defends the increase of the minimum wage, social security for all and wants a reform of the judicial system.

Rashida Tlaib, Muslim of Pakistani origin

Rebecca Cook / Reuters

If she did not have a declared Republican opponent, Rashida Tlaib entered the story anyway by going to Michigan for the House of Representatives. "We did it together, thank you!", Tweeted Ilhan Omar, before writing to Rashida Tlaib, born in Detroit of Palestinian immigrant parents: "Congratulations to my sister Rashida Tlaib for her victory. look forward to sitting with you, inchallah ".

42-year-old American-Palestinian, she was sure to win in a Democratic stronghold where she had no competitor of the opposition party. Her score speaks for her: 91% of the votes in half of the votes counted.

AlexandraOcasio-Cortez, the youngest woman elected to Congress

Andrew Kelly / Reuters

The young Hispanic Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, 29, the new face of a wave of women and minorities who pull the Democratic Party to the left, was elected to Congress and became the youngest member in history. The young woman, who had created the surprise in June by winning a Democratic primary against a heavyweight Congressman, Joe Crowley, largely defeated his Republican opponent Anthony Pappas, 72, in a riding in New York riding between the Queens and the Bronx, acquired to Democrats.

Originally from the Bronx, this former waitress, formerly a volunteer for Senator Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign, promised to speak for the "little people" in Congress. It intends to defend causes dear to the left wing of the Democratic Party, such as health coverage for all, free public universities, and the right to affordable housing. She campaigned tirelessly as she accompanied her child, her Puerto Rican housewife, or how her parents left the Bronx for a peaceful suburb of New York so she could attend better schools.

The youngest member of Congress so far was another New Yorker, Republican Elise Stefanik, elected for the first time in the House of Representatives in 2014 when she was 30 years old.

SDavids, First Native American Congresswoman

Whitney Curtis via Getty Images

Kansas Democrat Sharice Davids became Tuesday the first Native American to be elected to Congress. Martial arts lawyer, openly homosexual, she won in conservative lands against Republican Kevin Yoder.

The 38-year-old Sharice Davids, who was raised by a single mother who was a former army officer, graduated from a public training institute and spent a year in Washington in the Obama administration. She is one of the Democrats who tipped Tuesday in the hands of the Democrats several seats held by the Republicans in the lower house.

Deb Haaland, the other Native American in Congress

Brian Snyder / Reuters

Deb Haaland in Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 6.

Deb Haaland, 57, was elected to New Mexico. A single mother from the Laguna Pueblo tribe, she conquered alcoholism and survived on food stamps.

"I am a woman, I am a woman of color", said the candidate during the campaign, pointing to her brown face and her long black and smooth hair. "It's the kind of people you need in power right now to advance the issues that matter," she said at her meetings.

More than a dozen Amerindian men had already been elected, but until then no women from indigenous communities. This year, the legislative elections had recorded a record of Amerindian candidates.

Ayanna Pressley, first black woman representing Massachusetts

Brian Snyder / Reuters

Ayanna Pressley in Boston, Massachusetts on September 4th.

This 44-year-old Boston Democrat will be the first black woman to represent Massachusetts in Congress. She won unsurprisingly – without any opponents – her constituency for the House of Representatives, considered to be among the most left of the United States.

His real victory came in the primaries, against an old Democratic driver, Michael Capuano. Ayanna Pressley embodies a current to the left of the Democratic Party but also a rise in power of women in these elections.

Originally from Chicago, this activist conducted a field campaign, not hesitating to discuss her experiences of sexual assault and to invoke its proximity to the working classes to ensure that she would be "a different leader".

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