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Monkeypox: WHO warns of new infections

Published to: 24/05/2022 – 15:55

The World Health Organization said this Tuesday, May 24, that 131 cases of monkeypox have been identified since the resurgence of the disease in early May. There are still another 106 suspected cases and the WHO believes that new infections will emerge in the near future.

The World Health Organization advances that 131 cases of monkeypox have been identified since the resurgence of the disease in early May. There are still another 106 suspected cases and the WHO believes that new infections will emerge in the near future.

Despite the peak of infections, in more than ten countries, the WHO considers that the situation remains “controllable”but advises people to stay informed with national health authorities about the extent of the outbreak in their community, symptoms and prevention.

In an interview with RFI, Ricardo Mexia, a public health doctor in Portugal, says that monkeypox, a viral disease observed so far in Africa, is not new, but he admits that the big question is “the greater spread of the disease in people who have no history of travel to the African continent”.

The first human case was recorded in 1970 in the Democratic Republic of Congo, during a period of intense efforts to eliminate smallpox.

Monkeypox is transmitted through contact with an infected animal or person or material that is contaminated. Transmission between humans occurs mainly through large respiratory droplets, requiring prolonged contact, but also through bodily fluids.

Ricardo Mexia explains that the symptoms of the disease are “headache, fever, tiredness, then people end up having enlarged lymph nodes in the armpits and the disease progressed to skin lesions, rash”.

Many cases have been reported among the homosexual community, the WHO defends the importance of trying to avoid the sexual transmission of the disease.

At a time when the focus and route of contagion of smallpox from monkeys have not yet been established, the public health doctor warns of the importance of strengthening surveillance systems.

“It is essential to strengthen surveillance systems and try to understand what patients have in common so that we can identify the route of transmission”justified.

According to the World Health Organization, most people infected with monkeypox recover within a few weeks, but the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control admits that immunocompromised people are especially at risk of serious illness from this disease. virus.

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