NASA's Juno Probe offers a breathtaking view of "glorious, swirling clouds" on Jupiter

NASA's Juno Probe offers a breathtaking view of "glorious, swirling clouds" on Jupiter

NASA has unveiled a stunning new image of the whirling "oil painting" storms on Jupiter.

It shows storms in Jupiter's dynamic North North Temperate Belt, taken by the NASA spacecraft Juno.

"The scene features several light-white 'pop-up clouds' and an anti-cyclone storm known as the White Oval," NASA said.

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This color enhanced image was taken at 13:58. PDT on October 29, 2018 (4:58 am EDT) when the spacecraft completed its 16th near flyby of Jupiter. At that time, Juno was about 7,000 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops, about 40 degrees north.

This color enhanced image was taken at 13:58. PDT on October 29, 2018 (4:58 am EDT) when the spacecraft completed its 16th near flyby of Jupiter. At that time, Juno was about 7,000 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops and was about 40 degrees north latitude.

WHAT IS A WHITE OVAL?

White ovals are a large-scale storm prevailing in Jupiter.

White ovals can change their shape, wander through the atmosphere, jostle one another for position, and even merge together. Despite all this, white ovals in the Jupiter atmosphere have survived for 40 years or more – and can grow as tall as the earth.

"A multitude of magnificent, swirling clouds are captured in the dynamic north-north temperate belt of Jupiter."

It records the intensity of the jets and vortices in the temperate north-north belt of Jupiter.

The clouds are likely to consist of ammonia ice crystals or a combination of ammonia ice and water.

Although the region is generally chaotic, there is an alternating pattern of rotating, brighter elements on the north and south sides of the zone.

Scientists believe that the large-scale dark regions are places where the clouds are deeper, based on infrared observations made simultaneously with the Junir experiment JIRAM and Earth-based observational observations.

This color enhanced image was taken at 13:58. PDT on October 29, 2018 (4:58 am EDT) when the spacecraft completed its 16th near flyby of Jupiter.

At that time, Juno was about 7,000 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops and was about 40 degrees north latitude.

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran have created this image using data from the JunoCam imager of the spacecraft

The image, taken in the last few minutes of a close flyby of Jupiter, NASA's spacecraft Juno, drew a daunting look at the swirling southern hemisphere of the planet. At that time, Juno was about 89,500 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops, above a south latitude of about 75 degrees.

The image taken during the last minutes of a close flyby of Jupiter, the spacecraft Juno of NASA, provided an exciting view of the swirling southern hemisphere of the planet. At that time, Juno was about 89,600 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops, above a south latitude of about 75 degrees.

NASA's Juno probe previously showed a stunning view of Jupiter from the rearview mirror.

The image taken in the final minutes of a close flyby of Jupiter gives a glimpse of the swirling southern hemisphere of the planet.

It shows the huge storms and huge whirlpools that include the planet from a new perspective.

"The color enhanced picture was taken at 19:13. PDT on September 6, 2018 (10:13 pm EDT), when the spacecraft completed its 15th near-by fly of Jupiter, "NASA said.

At that time, Juno was about 89,600 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops, above a south latitude of about 75 degrees.

The citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt has created this image with data from the JunoCam imager of the spacecraft.

Previous images focused largely on storms in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter.

Earlier this year, NASA approved an update for Juno's science operation, which was scheduled to continue until July 2021.

NASA's Juno probe picked up this color-enhanced image at 10:23. PDT on May 23, 2018 (01:23 am EDT on May 24) when the spacecraft completed its 13th near-by fly of Jupiter. At that time, Juno was about 15,500 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops, above a latitude of 56 degrees north. The region you see here is a bit chaotic and turbulent given the different swirling cloud formations, NASA said.

NASA's Juno probe picked up this color-enhanced image at 10:23. PDT on May 23, 2018 (01:23 am EDT on May 24) when the spacecraft completed its 13th near-by fly of Jupiter. At that time, Juno was about 15,500 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops, above a latitude of 56 degrees north. The region you see here is a bit chaotic and turbulent given the different swirling cloud formations, NASA said.

"This means another 41 months in orbit around Jupiter and will enable Juno to achieve its primary scientific goals," NASA says.

Juno is in an orbit of 53 days and not 14 days orbitally, as originally planned.

This longer orbit means it takes longer to gather the required scientific data.

An independent panel of experts confirmed in April that Juno is meeting its science goals and is already achieving spectacular results.

The Juno probe and all instruments are healthy and work nominally.

NASA has now financed Juno until 2022.

The end of main operations is now expected in July 2021. Data analysis and mission completion activities will continue until 2022.

The color-enhanced image was taken at 23:31. PDT on May 23, 2018 (02:31 am EDT on May 24), when the spacecraft completed its 13th near-by fly of Jupiter. At that time, Juno was about 71,300 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops, above a south latitude of 71 degrees

The color-enhanced image was taken at 23:31. PDT on May 23, 2018 (EDT on May 24, 2:31 am EDT) as the spaceship completed its 13th near-by fly of Jupiter. At that time, Juno was about 71,300 kilometers from the planet's cloud tops, above a south latitude of 71 degrees

NASA has released another impressive picture of swirling storms on Jupiter.

The latest image of the Juno probe shows gigantic storms raged across the southern hemisphere of the planet.

It reveals the mighty storms and swirling vortexes cover the entire planet.

"The most recent picture of the southern hemisphere of Jupiter was taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft on the outgoing leg of a close-by flyby of the gas giant planet," NASA said.

WHAT IS NASA'S JUNO MISSION TO JUPITER?

The Juno spacecraft reached Jupiter in 2016 after a five-year, 1.8 billion mile journey from Earth

The Juno spacecraft reached Jupiter in 2016 after a five-year, 1.8 billion mile journey from Earth

The Juno spacecraft reached Jupiter on July 4, 2016 after a five-year, 2.8 billion-kilometer journey from Earth.

After a successful braking maneuver, it entered a long polar orbit that flew up to 5000 km from the planet's swirling cloud cover.

The probe was once every fourteen days at 4,200 km (4,200 km) from the planet's clouds – too close to provide global coverage in a single image.

No former spacecraft has turned so close to Jupiter, though two others have been plunged into destruction by their atmosphere.

In order to complete his risky mission, Juno survived a radiation storm caused by the strong magnetic field of Jupiter.

The vortex of high-energy particles, which move at near the speed of light, is the hardest radiation environment in the solar system.

To cope with the conditions, the spacecraft was protected with special radiation-hardened cables and sensor screens.

His most important "brain" – the flight computer of the spacecraft – was in an armored titanium vault weighing nearly 172 kg.

The craft will investigate the composition of the planet's atmosphere until 2021.

A bright oval in the lower middle stands out in the scene.

This feature appears uniform in ground-based telescope observations, astronomers said.

"With JunoCam, however, we can observe the fine structure within the weather system, including additional structures.

"There is no significant movement inside this feature. Like the Great Red Spot, the wind slows towards the center. "

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran have created this image using data from the JunoCam imager of the spacecraft.

Jupiter's storms at close range: The view is aligned to Jupiter to the south to the top left and north to the bottom right. The North North Temperate Belt is the prominent red-orange band to the left of the center. At that time, the Juno spacecraft was about 4900 miles (700 km) from the clouds of the gas giant at a north latitude of about 41 degrees.

Jupiter's storms at close range: The view is aimed at Jupiter to the south to the top left and north to the bottom right. The North North Temperate Belt is the prominent red-orange band to the left of the center. At that time, the Juno spacecraft was about 4900 miles (700 km) from the clouds of the gas giant at a north latitude of about 41 degrees.

These observations show a warmer and thus lower thermal emission from these regions.

To the right of the bright zone and further north on the planet, the striking stripe structure of Jupiter becomes less clear, and one can see a region of individual cyclones interspersed with smaller, darker anticyclones.

Civic scientist Kevin M. Gill has created this image using JunoCam imager data from the spacecraft.

Most of the pictures focus on the big red spot of Jupiter.

Once large enough to swallow three Earth, Jupiter's "Great Red Spot" shrinks at a speed of 230 miles per year, pushing its clouds upward, according to a recent NASA study.

WHAT IS THE GREAT RED SPOT OF JUPITER?

Jupiter's large red spot is a huge oval of purple clouds in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter, racing counterclockwise around the circumference of the oval.

The biggest storm in the solar system appears as a deep red sphere surrounded by bright yellow, orange and white layers.

The Great Red Spot is an anticyclone trapped between two jet streams, spinning around a high-atmospheric center and turning it in the opposite direction to hurricanes on Earth.

Jupiter's Great Red Spot is a huge oval of purple clouds in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter, racing counterclockwise around the circumference of the oval

Jupiter's large red spot is a huge oval of purple clouds in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter, racing counterclockwise around the circumference of the oval

The winds within the storm were measured at several hundred kilometers per hour. Windstorms are bigger than any storm on Earth, astronomers at NASA said.

In the late 1800s, a diameter of about 35,000 miles (about 56,000 km) was estimated – so large that four earth could fit next to each other.

The Big Red Spot measures 10,000 miles (3,000 miles) on April 3, 2017, and is 1.3 times the width of the earth, becoming smaller and smaller over time.

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