New York Primary: Governor Andrew M. Cuomo defeats actress Cynthia Nixon after move to the left

New York Primary: Governor Andrew M. Cuomo defeats actress Cynthia Nixon after move to the left

New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo won a nominee for a third term against actress and activist Cynthia Nixon on Sunday against President Trump in a political landscape transformed by a revived left wing, according to a press release by the Associated Press on Thursday ,

Nixon called for a liberal upheaval aimed at immediate action in the areas of immigration, housing and healthcare, while Cuomo provided a track record after abandoning his political agenda in response to the challenge.

With about a third of the districts, Cuomo Nixon outperformed a 2-1 margin – about the same size as his first victory in 2014 against another liberal challenger.

The race came to a bitter end. His last days were spent in controversy over a mailer sent by the Democratic Party of the State, which accused Nixon, who raises Jewish children, of anti-Semitism. The Cuomo campaign confirmed on Wednesday that political activists affiliated with the governor have written and approved the ad that the governor disavowed.

This controversy added a late intrigue to a race that would otherwise have appended Nixon's attacks on Cuomo as a "corporate democrat" regardless of the needs of the working class, especially those in New York City who depend on a subway system which has worsened Cuomo's watch.

Cuomo has beaten off by highlighting his work on two terms to tighten state arms laws, ban gas drilling, increase minimum wages, and move ahead with public works projects – while arguing that a public service in New York is life-long Families have made him the best choice for Trump, who spoke out against the priorities of his home state in Washington.


From left, Letitia James, Sean Patrick Maloney, Leecia Eve and Zephyr Teachout at a debate on August 28 in Manhattan. They seek the Democratic nomination as New York Attorney General. (Holly Pickett / AP)

"The way I did this campaign was about the issues, it was positive," Cuomo said at a press conference on Sunday. "I think the mailer was a mistake, I think it was inappropriate."

Nixon has also tried to launch a first campaign, arguing that a liberal state like New York has been run too long by Democrats who are too willing to work with Republicans, and too timid to take on donors. Along the way, she has supported nationwide universal health care, free tuition, leases, and a public transport plan designed to rebuild the commuter rail system.

"We have a Democratic Party leadership that is so much whiter and so much older, so much more responsible for corporate America than its base," Nixon said at a weekend charity event in Manhattan. "This is a fight for the soul of the Democratic Party."

The race echoed contests during this half-year, when established Democrats like Cuomo moved to the left to appease voters and activists driven by insurgent candidates like Nixon. This has often brought victory to the establishment, but has provided ideological boastful rights to the left.

For the first time since spring, Nixon was tempted to face a challenge, and he pursued a liberal policy he had previously resisted, such as granting probation, a gentler marijuana line, and banning shopping bags.

Cuomo has also dramatically outperformed Nixon by investing at least $ 25 million in his campaign, and surveys have shown that he led them by 30-40 points.

"There is no question that she has pushed him further to the left," said Kathleen Rice MP (D-N.Y.), a former Long Island state attorney who unsuccessfully ran for an attorney general in 2010 with the support of Cuomo.

Rice said she focused on the voting race where she watched Democratic voters pick candidates for the vice-governor and attorney-general who have distanced themselves from Cuomo and the state-run establishment.

Voters are rebelling against candidates whom they believe have been hand-picked by the party establishment: "That's the kind of inner politics that voters hate."

One of these candidates is Jumaane Williams, a member of the New York City Council, the Cuomos Vice-Comrade, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul, challenged from the left. Williams, who would be the state's second black vice governor, has attacked Hochul for conservative voices and allegations she made while advocating a republican-leaning house seat, claiming that she has allowed Cuomo's worst instincts.

"You can be an activist and a prolific elected official," Williams said. "Most things the governor deserves when you take away the smoke and the mirrors are smaller than he said."

While Williams is an outsider, the race for Attorney General is considered wide open, and Nixon, Williams and Liberal groups have come behind Zephyr Teachout's anti-corruption, anti-monopoly candidate.

The unique situation in their race – Eric Schneiderman's resignation, after women had accused him of physical abuse, created a short four-month high season – led to a four-way crush. Letitia James, New York's elected public attorney, secured the party's support and Cuomo's support. Deputy Sean Maloney (D) and Verizon's Vice President, Leecía Eve, entered the race, Maloney transferred money from his congressional campaign to run TV commercials that made him competitive with James.

But the perception that James was too close to Cuomo created an opening for Teachout, which ran unsuccessfully for governor in 2014 and for Congress in 2016. After a slow start, she drew money and endorsements – including a New York Times endorsement centering the front and in all of her ads. Teachout, who rejected "corporate money" and debated how little-used state laws could help her investigate Wall Street and the Trump administration, began to command the most attention in the race.

The other participants reacted with an attack. In the concluding debates, Maloney and Eve – who had a hard time breaking out in the single-digit range – attacked Teachout because they recently passed the New York Bar and did not turn down corporate money in their 2016 House campaign. Teachout backed down by pointing to Maloney's report in the House, which included votes to withdraw parts of the Affordable Care Act and the Dodd-Frank banking regulation.

The race could affect Democrats' efforts to win the House of Representatives. Maloney, one of only 12 Democrats representing the districts won by Donald Trump in 2016, has to give up his home race when he becomes the candidate for Attorney General. While the Democrats would be able to choose a new candidate, a race that is not considered profitable for the Republicans in 2018 would be a potential pick-up. (Area codes for the house were held in June.)

Democratic Congression Campaign Committee leader Ben Ray Luján (N.M.) told reporters Thursday that he had not personally spoken with a possible replacement for Maloney, but said his group had "made" the potential candidates diligent.

The primaries on Thursday will also decide on the fates of eight senators elected as Democrats who formed an "Independent Democratic Conference" that voted for Republican Senate scrutiny. All eight IDC members face challenges even after the conference has ended. Four members in New York City – Tony Avella, Jose Peralta, Jesse Hamilton and Jeff Klein – are considered particularly vulnerable. The challengers of the last three races have been supported by Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) and other powerful Democrats.

Two Democrats who were not in the IDC, Simcha Felder and Martin Dilan, are also faced with challengers. Felder voted for Republicans to retain control of the state senate to bring resources to its majority Jewish district; Dilan is challenged by Julia Salazar, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America, who received glowing early coverage, then flooded with allegations that she was mistakenly portrayed as a working-class immigrant.

Thursday's primaries are for state and local races only and were held on Thursday to avoid the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah on Tuesday.

The winners of the Democratic prime minister will face Republican Marc Molinaro and runner-up Julie Killian in November. Everyone ran on Thursday without resistance.

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