North Korea Crisis in News Ticker: Trump: "Will Most Probably Meet Kim Jong Un"


Trump: "Will most likely meet Kim Jong Un again"

Tuesday, August 21, 3:59 pm: US President Donald Trump told Reuters on Monday he "most likely" will reunite with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in an effort to persuade Pyongyang to give up his nuclear weapons.

In an interview, Trump, who held a historic summit with Kim on June 12, said that specific steps towards denuclearization had been taken in North Korea despite widespread doubts about Kim's willingness to abandon his nuclear arsenal. While insisting that "lots of good things" are happening with North Korea, Trump lamented that China has not helped as much as in the past because of its trade dispute with the United States.

Trump, who faced the North Korean challenge immediately after taking office in January 2017, said he had only been working on the North Korean issue for three months while his predecessors had been working on it for 30 years. "I stopped (North Korea) nuclear tests, I stopped (North Korea) missile testing, Japan is excited, what will happen, who knows, we'll see," he said.

At her summit in Singapore, Kim generally agreed to work towards denuclearizing the Korean peninsula, but North Korea has not indicated that it is prepared to unilaterally abandon its weapons, as the Trump administration has demanded. Nevertheless, Trump celebrated the Singapore Summit as a success and went so far as to say that North Korea no longer poses a nuclear threat.

Monday, August 20, 8.18 am: Dozens of South Koreans traveled over the border to North Korea on Monday to celebrate the first family reunion for three years. The three-day meeting will be held in the North Korean Kumgang region.

From the South Korean side 89 seniors participate. Formally dressed, they had first boarded buses in the South Korean Sokcho in the morning, which then set off in the north accompanied by police and medical personnel. The convoy later passed the demilitarized zone and the border with North Korea.

By the Korean War (1950 to 1953) millions of people had been separated. Many family members have not seen each other since.

North and South Korea had started a course of rapprochement at the beginning of the year. Among other things, both sides agreed to organize family reunions more often. Since 2000, neighboring countries had organized 20 such meetings.

Now, time is running out for many of those affected. Most of those still hoping for a reunion with their relatives from the north are now over 80 years old.

These photos show that Trump's North Korea strategy could actually work out

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