One in four hospital employees was abused by patients

One in four hospital employees was abused by patients

One in four Oxford University Hospitals NHS staff experienced bullying, harassment or abuse last year, figures show.

The government has announced new measures to better protect health care workers in England and calls for a zero tolerance approach.

The responses to the latest NHS staff survey show that 26 percent of NHS Trust employees at Oxford University Hospitals said they experienced bullying, harassment, or abuse of patients, loved ones, or the public in 2017.

Another 28 percent said they were verbally abused or molested by another employee.

Around 4,540 employees took part in the survey, which also asked them about incidents of physical violence at the workplace.

One in eight respondents said they experienced violence from patients, relatives or the public.

Union Unison said that anyone who threatens or abuses NHS staff should be "prosecuted".

Healthcare chief Sara Gorton said, "No one should be abused, threatened or attacked at work – especially if they only want to help people."

Health Minister Matt Hancock said it was "unacceptable" for health workers to be subjected to violence and aggression.

The Department of Health and Welfare said that the NHS has worked with the police and prosecutors to quickly prosecute offenders under a "zero tolerance" approach.

The Care Quality Commission will review individual trusts based on their plans to reduce violence against employees and identify those who need further assistance to protect their employees.

The DHSC also said that there is a new system for recording abuses and other cases of abuse or harassment. Trusts are expected to thoroughly investigate incidents.

He said staff were also better trained for violent situations and offered psychiatric support for victims of abuse and abuses.

He said, "I've made it my personal mission to make sure the NHS staff feel safe and secure at work, and the new force reduction strategy will be an important part of that."

The plans follow the Law on Assaults on Criminals (Offenses) earlier this year, which doubled the maximum prison sentence for six months' emergency relief to one year.

Throughout England, 15% of NHS employees experienced violence in 2017, the highest level in five years.

Dr. Taj Hassan, President of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, welcomed the new measures and said, "Patients and their families who go to emergency rooms often experience the worst day of their lives – worried, confused and often frustrated.

"That can be understandable, what's unacceptable is when it goes into violence."

He added, "Employees always strive to provide the best possible care in a pressurized environment – it is always wrong to defend oneself against those who try to help."

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